Seattle is in the midst of a crisis. Tent camps have become a common sight, along with homeless people, many of whom suffer from drug addiction, mental illness or both. We recently ran a post about the frustration of police officers in Seattle and how some of them are even resigning because they feel like they’re not being allowed to do their jobs.

A special program from KOMO News called “Seattle is Dying” examined these and other issues. The city’s leadership doesn’t seem to be doing anything about it and quite a few residents have had it.

The program contains images that are downright shocking. Parts of the city look like a permanent occupy encampment, complete with massive piles of garbage that contain hazardous waste like used hypodermic needles.

Here’s a description of the report from Eric Johnson of KOMO:

KOMO News Special: Seattle is Dying

Seattle Is Dying. It’s a harsh title. Someone on social media even called it a “hopeless” title. I’ll admit to you that I wrestled with the name for some time. Too dramatic, I wondered? Too dark? In the end I went with it because I believe it to be true. I believe that Seattle is dying. Rotting from within.

This show, that we’ve been working on for several months now, is really the third in a kind of trilogy.

The first was called “There But For the Grace of God…” It explored homelessness from the inside out in 2016.

The second was called, “Demon at the Door.” It was about the hellish existence of heroin addiction.

This one is about everyone else. It’s about citizens who don’t feel safe taking their families into downtown Seattle. It’s about parents who won’t take their children into the public parks they pay for. It’s about filth and degradation all around us. And theft and crime. It’s about people who don’t feel protected anymore, who don’t feel like their voices are being heard.

John Sexton of Hot Air adds this:

There’s a section featuring angry residents of one area of the city who are screaming at their representatives for action. They want the tent cities managed and they’re tired of calling the police only to find out the police can arrest people but those same people will be back on the street, sometimes within hours.

As I noted last month, just 100 homeless people in Seattle were responsible for 3,500 criminal cases. This special references that story. It also asked Seattle police officers to comment anonymously on what was happening and those responses are enlightening. One officer told KOMO, “People come here because it’s called Free-attle and they believe if they come here they will get free food, free medical treatment, free mental health treatment, a free tent, free clothes and will be free of prosecution for just about everything; and they’re right.”

The program is just under an hour long and worth your time:

Featured image via YouTube.