A deadly tsunami slammed Indonesia without warning last night, killing hundred and causing widespread damage.

At least 222 people were killed as waves smashed into houses, hotels and other beachside buildings Saturday night along Indonesia’s Sunda Strait, in a disaster that followed an eruption and possible landslide on Anak Krakatau, one of the world’s most infamous volcanic islands.

More than 800 others were injured and dozens were reported missing after the tsunami hit coastal areas along western Java and southern Sumatra islands at 9:27 p.m. Saturday amid a Christmas holiday weekend, the Disaster Management Agency said. The death toll could increase once authorities hear from all stricken areas.

It was the second deadly tsunami to hit Indonesia this year, but the one that killed more than 2,500 people on the island of Sulawesi on Sept. 28 was accompanied by a powerful earthquake that gave residents a brief warning before the waves struck.

The tsunami is thought to have been caused by the eruption of the Anak Krakatoa volcano, which is the descendant of the infamous Krakatoa volcano, which erupted with the power of over 13,000 nuclear bombs and triggered massive waves throughout the region. It is suspected that the recent blast triggered a landslide.

Anak Krakatau, meaning Child of Krakatoa, rose out of the sea in 1927 as lava effused out at such a fast rate that the erosional capabilities of the water faded into insignificance. It’s been making headlines for a few months now as it’s flung out lava bombs and generated a fair bit of volcanic lightning since mid-June. As it’s located far from any population centres, such activity is essentially harmless.

Saying that, it’s certainly capable of grander events. It appears a rather significant eruption took place at around the time of the tsunami, at 2103 hours local time, which – per the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre – produced an ash cloud over 16.8 kilometres (about 55,000 feet) high. It’s possible, then, that a major blast at Anak Krakatau dislodged enough of the island, triggered a landslide above or below sea level, and subsequently generated a tsunami.

Footage that is being shared widely on social media the tsunami wave plowing into a boy band’s performance in Indonesia.

Crowds can be seen in the shocking video swaying along to a beach-side Saturday performance by the rock band Seventeen — seconds before the natural disaster hits, engulfing the stage.

Loud shrieks can be heard before the 11-second video goes dark.

The band confirmed that their bassist M Awal Purbani, guitarist Herman Sikumbang and their road manager Oki Wijaya were dead.

“The water washed away the stage… and dragged away everyone at the location,” the statement said.

Two other musicians, a crewmember and the wife of the band’s frontman are still missing.

Additional information on how landslides trigger tsunamis can be found HERE. Historically, one of the most catastrophic tusunamis now known hit the Eastern Mediterranean 8,000 years ago after a large portion of Sicily’s Mt. Etna slid into the sea.

Our prayers go out to the people of Indonesia.

 
 
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