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German ISIS Bride Charged with Murder of 5-year-old ‘Slave’

German ISIS Bride Charged with Murder of 5-year-old ‘Slave’

“Authorities said that Jennifer W. and her husband, also a jihadi, bought a 5-year-old girl as a household slave in 2015.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hAlKlQ2g1Q&t=40s

German prosecutors have charged a 27-year-old ISIS bride with the murder of a 5-year-old ‘slave’ girl. The German national, named in the media as Jennifer W., traveled to Syria in 2014, where she and her husband bought the little girl as a slave.

The helpless child was chained by the Woman’s husband and left to die of thirst in the desert heat for the “crime” of wetting her mattress, German authorities say. “The accused did not stop her husband and did nothing to save the girl,” an investigator said. The identity of the man has not been revealed.

According to the German Public Prosecutor General, she showed no repentance and vowed to return back to Syria to serve the Islamic State.

Jennifer W. is the first woman to be prosecuted for ISIS war crimes in Germany, the newspaper Die Welt said. She also served in the ISIS ‘moral police’, an armed outfit that carried out public lashings and torture of women who failed to comply with group’s Sharia regulations.

German broadcaster Deutsche Welle reported the details of the court proceedings:

A former member of the “Islamic State” (IS) group is facing war crimes charges in Germany over the death of a child, German prosecutors said on Friday.

Authorities said that Jennifer W. and her husband, also a jihadi, bought a 5-year-old girl as a household slave in 2015.

“After the girl fell ill and wet her mattress, the husband of the accused chained her up outside as punishment and let the child die of thirst in the scorching heat,” they said in a statement.

“The accused allowed her husband to do so and did nothing to save the girl.”

Months after the child’s death, Jennifer W. traveled to Ankara to apply for new identity papers at the German embassy. However, she was arrested by Turkish security services upon leaving the building, and extradited to her home country.

She was initially allowed to return to her home in northwest Germany. However, her “declared goal” has been to travel back to IS-controlled territory, prosecutors said.

The news comes as Chancellor Merkel’s government is undertaking a diplomatic efforts to bring back 35 ISIS fighters and their families held in Kurdish prisons, Die Welt reported last month.

The German intelligence agency has repeatedly warned the government not to bring back ISIS fighters and their families over to Germany. “There are children who have been brainwashed and highly radicalized at ‘schools’ in IS-held areas,” the outgoing  German intelligence chief Hans-Georg Maassen said last year. Many of these women “had become so radicalized and identify so deeply with IS-ideology that, by all accounts, they must also be identified as jihadis,” he added.

These warnings have fallen on deaf ears. The senior government officials have justified these repatriations citing “humanitarian considerations and Germany’s duty to protect its citizens.”

The case of Jennifer W. is a scathing indictment of Chancellor Merkel’s handling of the returning ISIS war criminals. Out of 960 German nationals who traveled to the Middle East to fight for the Islamic Caliphate, over three hundred have returned home. Only handful of these war criminals have faced any kind of interrogation or detention in the country, German weekly Der Spiegel disclosed earlier this year.

The incident also puts the spot light on the genocidal crimes committed by the Islamic State against the Yazidis, Assyrian Christians and Kurdish people. So far, over 200 mass graves containing the remains of some 12,000 men, women and children have been uncovered in Iraq. Thousands still remain unaccounted for after Islamic State’s three-year reign in Iraq that ended in December 2017. With conflict still raging in Syria, the full extent of the Islamist war crimes is yet to be ascertained.

Nobel laureate Nadia Murad recalls ISIS brutalities 

[Cover image via You Tube]

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75 years ago, “Jennifer W.” would have been the most sadistic female SS guard to ever walk at turn at Auschwitz. Damn shame that Germany has abolished the death penalty: if anybody deserves to be hanged, it’s this unhinged jihadi b*tch.

It’s the insanity of the left. We just had another murder by an illegal alien, a Police Officer and the left won’t even admit it happened.

    Edward in reply to Jackie. | December 29, 2018 at 10:40 am

    And I’ve read that the police officer was a legal immigrant, killed by an Illegal Alien protected by the government.

This woman is evil. Remember, it’s ok in isl-am to have slaves.
Horrifyingly, slavery is still occurring in the world- Middle East, Central Asia, Africa, but the white man (who ended slavery in the West) continues to be vilified.

The assertion is ridiculous. Not the crime – the assertion that:

“The accused allowed her husband to do so and did nothing to save the girl.”

Allowed? “Allowed”…? If the legal standard is that her presence and existence and the fact she breathed air while married to the perpetrator makes her guilty, fine. We all know exactly what would have happened if she attempted to “disallow” what her husband was doing. Perhaps, legally and morally, we really don’t care. She was there; we oblige her to save the child or die trying. And she would have died trying.

I refuse, however, to humor her trying, and surviving the process, as a realistic possibility.

    Vijeta Uniyal in reply to JBourque. | December 29, 2018 at 11:00 am

    I get your point. But it must be noted that the woman has been charged under the German criminal code (StGB) which sees negligence to assist a person in danger (unterlassene Hilfeleistung) as a criminal offense.

    stevewhitemd in reply to JBourque. | December 29, 2018 at 2:18 pm

    Allowing people to get away with “allowing” their spouse to commit a crime, even when afraid that the spouse will harm them, undermines our legal system. That’s based on individual responsibility and the idea that our obligation to do the right thing supersedes our obligation to our spouse. Yes, there is a spousal clause in the self-incrimination code; we won’t force a spouse to testify against the other.

    But for this woman to turn her head and let her husband murder the girl? At the very least that’s willful negligence, and it’s more likely accomplice to murder. Book ’em, Danno.

      I have no nice words for this. As the wife of an ISIS member, her relative rights and rank would have barely differed from the slave. By all means, if you can prove to a court that she participated in the murder and rightly bears its weight, convict her. But don’t call convicting the secretary of embezzlement because the CEO she served stole money from the corporation, “personal responsibility”. It is no such thing.

      If Germany holds that there is a binding legal responsibility that the wife ensures she dies with the child, I can see the moral case. But I didn’t think the laws in the west were intended to work that way. It’s also very inconsistent with the European distaste for the death penalty.

    In fairness, I didn’t get the impression that she had any objections to what happened. She wants to return to ISIS. This might have something to do with why the prosecutors essentially consider her an accomplice.

    I can see how there will be situations where the wife is afraid to cross her husband, but I see no indication of that here, and indeed, it is not an argument she appears to be making. I am not inclined to invent an excuse for her when she claims none for herself.

      The world will go absolutely mad if we start making people guilty of the crimes they did not commit, but only failed to prevent. And if the issue is her being complicit in the crimes of ISIS, her marriage and her husband have nothing to do with it, do they?

This story raises more questions than it answers. For example, where did the killing take place? And, assuming it was somewhere outside Germany (since the killing took place in a “desert” and Germany has no desert), how do German prosecutors have jurisdiction to prosecute a killing that took place outside Germany, presumably somewhere in the Middle East?

I expect the answer is that every country has jurisdiction to prosecute any war crime, regardless of where it took place, and that that’s the reason the German prosecutors categorized this killing as a “war crime”.

But whether it can be fairly categorized as a war crime, I have no idea. And this article certainly doesn’t shed any light on that interesting question.

    gospace in reply to JPL17. | December 29, 2018 at 11:51 am

    Many countries retain the right to try their own citizens for crimes committed regardless of where they were committed.

    Then there’s the Mueller example. Indicting Russians in Russia for violating US election laws without ever leaving Russia…

      JPL17 in reply to gospace. | December 29, 2018 at 12:04 pm

      Damn “reply” button is too close to the “thumbs down” button! I’m sorry about down-dinging you, I certainly didn’t mean to do that.

      I think Mueller’s indictment of the Russians is actually a fairly conventional exercise of extraterritorial jurisdiction. It’s based on “acts occurring outside the U.S. that have an effect within the U.S.” In contrast, the killing of the little girl outside Germany doesn’t appear to have an “effect” in Germany in the jurisdictional sense. I think that’s why the prosecutors didn’t base jurisdiction on conventional theories of extraterritoriality, and relied on “war crime” extraterritorial jurisdiction instead.

        tom_swift in reply to JPL17. | December 29, 2018 at 3:33 pm

        I think that’s why the prosecutors didn’t base jurisdiction on conventional theories of extraterritoriality, and relied on “war crime” extraterritorial jurisdiction instead.

        No doubt. It’s become a great “catch-all” for things which otherwise don’t seem to have any relevant statute.

        The venerable concept of “war crime” was spectacularly expanded just after WW2—and also mixed in with the more diffuse and undeveloped notion of “crimes against humanity”—to justify the famous war crimes tribunals.

        The basic problem facing Telford Taylor and his fellow architects of this expansion was that gross abuse of, say, German citizens by a German government isn’t, in conventional terms, a crime at all. It’s not against any American law for Germans to torture or murder their own citizens, and if it’s not a violation of a German law (and the NSDAP made sure that it wasn’t), then law has nothing much to say about the event. (Taylor was honest enough to write a book about his agonizing over the way to give the whole “war crimes tribunals” thing a plausible legal basis.)

        Those who, not too unreasonably, wanted the disaster of WW2 to be “about something” had to change that. So, non-crimes were retroactively labeled “war crimes”, whether or not they had much to do with the war, and any of the belligerent countries then had justification to pursue conventional legal proceedings. (These are not to be confused with the earlier concept of “war crimes” such as those carefully defined in the Hague Conventions, and less carefully defined by post-Medieval custom.)

        Things rapidly got weird. For example, Grossadmiral Karl Döenitz was charged with the “crime” of “prolonging the war”, which had never been a crime before; as the legal head of state at the time, he would normally have every right to do that, even if it turned out to be bad policy.

        We’re still stuck with the consequences of this postwar conceptual expansion today, when just about everybody seems to feel qualified to declare anything he doesn’t like a “war crime” or “crime against humanity” whether it is or not.

    JPL17 in reply to JPL17. | December 29, 2018 at 2:51 pm

    Instead of a meaningless and possibly mindless down-ding without comment, how about trying to explain your objection to my post?

“Household slave” — that’s a euphemism for either “sex slave” or “cannon fodder.”

There is no such thing as getting work out of a five-year-old. The child was bough for the purpose of being abused or killed.

    stevewhitemd in reply to Valerie. | December 29, 2018 at 2:20 pm

    Excellent point, hadn’t thought of it that way.

    tom_swift in reply to Valerie. | December 29, 2018 at 3:05 pm

    Like any property, a young slave can be an investment.

    gospace in reply to Valerie. | December 29, 2018 at 4:02 pm

    Never lived next door to an Amish or Mennonite family, obviously. 5 year olds have chores. Heck, I wasn’t either, and when I was 5 I’d walk the dog each morning down to the corner, drop 4¢ into the slot on the wall, take the NY Daily News off the rack (making sure to put the rock back on the stack so the other papers didn’t blow away), walk back home and give the newspaper to my father.

    You’re not going to get heavy labor out of a 5 year old, but you can get work.

Merkel should have her head on a pike

    C. Lashown in reply to stutz bearcat. | December 29, 2018 at 2:39 pm

    ACTUALLY, Mutter Merkel is such a lover of all things Islamic, I’m shocked that she didn’t give the female beast from Germany a free house and a lifetime pension for being so cold-blooded nasty. Mutter Merkel, hates all things European…or so it seems.

Markel was an east German communist. This is exactly what you should expect from a communist.

caseoftheblues | December 29, 2018 at 9:28 pm

German ISIS Bride Charged with Murder of 5-year-old ‘Slave’
Vijeta Uniyal | 12/29/2018 – 10:00am
“Authorities said that Jennifer W. and her husband, also a jihadi, bought a 5-year-old girl as a household slave in 2015.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hAlKlQ2g1Q&t=40s

German prosecutors have charged a 27-year-old ISIS bride with the murder of a 5-year-old ‘slave’ girl. The German national, named in the media as Jennifer W., traveled to Syria in 2014, where she and her husband bought the little girl as a slave.

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The helpless child was chained by the Woman’s husband and left to die of thirst in the desert heat for the “crime” of wetting her mattress, German authorities say. “The accused did not stop her husband and did nothing to save the girl,” an investigator said. The identity of the man has not been revealed.

According to the German Public Prosecutor General, she showed no repentance and vowed to return back to Syria to serve the Islamic State.

Jennifer W. is the first woman to be prosecuted for ISIS war crimes in Germany, the newspaper Die Welt said. She also served in the ISIS ‘moral police’, an armed outfit that carried out public lashings and torture of women who failed to comply with group’s Sharia regulations.

German broadcaster Deutsche Welle reported the details of the court proceedings:

A former member of the “Islamic State” (IS) group is facing war crimes charges in Germany over the death of a child, German prosecutors said on Friday.

Authorities said that Jennifer W. and her husband, also a jihadi, bought a 5-year-old girl as a household slave in 2015.

“After the girl fell ill and wet her mattress, the husband of the accused chained her up outside as punishment and let the child die of thirst in the scorching heat,” they said in a statement.

“The accused allowed her husband to do so and did nothing to save the girl.”

Months after the child’s death, Jennifer W. traveled to Ankara to apply for new identity papers at the German embassy. However, she was arrested by Turkish security services upon leaving the building, and extradited to her home country.

She was initially allowed to return to her home in northwest Germany. However, her “declared goal” has been to travel back to IS-controlled territory, prosecutors said.

The news comes as Chancellor Merkel’s government is undertaking a diplomatic efforts to bring back 35 ISIS fighters and their families held in Kurdish prisons, Die Welt reported last month.

The German intelligence agency has repeatedly warned the government not to bring back ISIS fighters and their families over to Germany. “There are children who have been brainwashed and highly radicalized at ‘schools’ in IS-held areas,” the outgoing German intelligence chief Hans-Georg Maassen said last year. Many of these women “had become so radicalized and identify so deeply with IS-ideology that, by all accounts, they must also be identified as jihadis,” he added.

These warnings have fallen on deaf ears. The senior government officials have justified these repatriations citing “humanitarian considerations and Germany’s duty to protect its citizens.”

The case of Jennifer W. is a scathing indictment of Chancellor Merkel’s handling of the returning ISIS war criminals. Out of 960 German nationals who traveled to the Middle East to fight for the Islamic Caliphate, over three hundred have returned home. Only handful of these war criminals have faced any kind of interrogation or detention in the country, German weekly Der Spiegel disclosed earlier this year.

The incident also puts the spot light on the genocidal crimes committed by the Islamic State against the Yazidis, Assyrian Christians and Kurdish people. So far, over 200 mass graves containing the remains of some 12,000 men, women and children have been uncovered in Iraq. Thousands still remain unaccounted for after Islamic State’s three-year reign in Iraq that ended in December 2017. With conflict still raging in Syria, the full extent of the Islamist war crimes is yet to be ascertained.

Nobel laureate Nadia Murad recalls ISIS brutalities

[Cover image via You Tube]

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Comments
MarkJ | December 29, 2018 at 10:15 am
75 years ago, “Jennifer W.” would have been the most sadistic female SS guard to ever walk at turn at Auschwitz. Damn shame that Germany has abolished the death penalty: if anybody deserves to be hanged, it’s this unhinged jihadi b*tch.

Jackie | December 29, 2018 at 10:22 am
It’s the insanity of the left. We just had another murder by an illegal alien, a Police Officer and the left won’t even admit it happened.

Edward | December 29, 2018 at 10:40 am
And I’ve read that the police officer was a legal immigrant, killed by an Illegal Alien protected by the government.

lc | December 29, 2018 at 10:34 am
This woman is evil. Remember, it’s ok in isl-am to have slaves.
Horrifyingly, slavery is still occurring in the world- Middle East, Central Asia, Africa, but the white man (who ended slavery in the West) continues to be vilified.

JBourque | December 29, 2018 at 10:45 am
The assertion is ridiculous. Not the crime – the assertion that:

“The accused allowed her husband to do so and did nothing to save the girl.”

Allowed? “Allowed”…? If the legal standard is that her presence and existence and the fact she breathed air while married to the perpetrator makes her guilty, fine. We all know exactly what would have happened if she attempted to “disallow” what her husband was doing. Perhaps, legally and morally, we really don’t care. She was there; we oblige her to save the child or die trying. And she would have died trying.

I refuse, however, to humor her trying, and surviving the process, as a realistic possibility.

Vijeta Uniyal | December 29, 2018 at 11:00 am
I get your point. But it must be noted that the woman has been charged under the German criminal code (StGB) which sees negligence to assist a person in danger (unterlassene Hilfeleistung) as a criminal offense.

stevewhitemd | December 29, 2018 at 2:18 pm
Allowing people to get away with “allowing” their spouse to commit a crime, even when afraid that the spouse will harm them, undermines our legal system. That’s based on individual responsibility and the idea that our obligation to do the right thing supersedes our obligation to our spouse. Yes, there is a spousal clause in the self-incrimination code; we won’t force a spouse to testify against the other.

But for this woman to turn her head and let her husband murder the girl? At the very least that’s willful negligence, and it’s more likely accomplice to murder. Book ’em, Danno.

JBourque | December 29, 2018 at 2:47 pm
I have no nice words for this. As the wife of an ISIS member, her relative rights and rank would have barely differed from the slave. By all means, if you can prove to a court that she participated in the murder and rightly bears its weight, convict her. But don’t call convicting the secretary of embezzlement because the CEO she served stole money from the corporation, “personal responsibility”. It is no such thing.

If Germany holds that there is a binding legal responsibility that the wife ensures she dies with the child, I can see the moral case. But I didn’t think the laws in the west were intended to work that way. It’s also very inconsistent with the European distaste for the death penalty.

Thatch | December 29, 2018 at 5:07 pm
In fairness, I didn’t get the impression that she had any objections to what happened. She wants to return to ISIS. This might have something to do with why the prosecutors essentially consider her an accomplice.

I can see how there will be situations where the wife is afraid to cross her husband, but I see no indication of that here, and indeed, it is not an argument she appears to be making. I am not inclined to invent an excuse for her when she claims none for herself.

JBourque | December 29, 2018 at 8:50 pm
The world will go absolutely mad if we start making people guilty of the crimes they did not commit, but only failed to prevent……

Hmmmm…you mean like every white person being held responsible for slavery hundreds of years ago…like that?

I am one 1/8 Irish. Which means I am more Irish than Liawatha is hpfgersalom

Just like the old days. And Germany welcomes the new NAZIs…..Muslims. Just like the old NAZIs.

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