Students are effectively financing the social justice ‘jobs’ of other students. Is that fair?

Campus Reform reports:

UCLA makes students pay classmates to promote ‘social justice’

The University of California-Los Angeles has hired 18 students at $13 per hour to combat “social injustices” and “privilege and oppression” following a semester-long recruitment campaign.

Hosted by the UCLA Intergroup Relations Program, the Diversity Peer Leaders project is a year-long internship during which students facilitate workshops on social justice issues in exchange for leadership training and compensation from UCLA.

According to the job application, each DPL is paid $13 an hour in exchange for working 30-45 hours during each of UCLA’s four academic quarters, including summer.

If all students put in just 30 hours per quarter, the program would cost at least $28,080 annually, but if all the DPLs were to work the maximum hours, the cost would rise to at least $42,120 per year.

Reached by Campus Reform, a UCLA spokesman did not dispute these estimates, but stressed that the program is funded by the school’s Students Services Fee, rather than tuition or taxpayer dollars.

That $376 per term fee is not optional, costing each student $1,128 every academic year. Over a four-year degree, the fee amounts to at least $4,512—more if a student takes longer to graduate.

UCLA student Arik Schneider mocked the DPL program as “a project of the Department of Redundancy Department,” asserting that “all the goals of this project seems to already be facilitated by multiple other programs, groups, and systems” on campus.