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Using Pink and Blue to Denote Sex Declared ‘Bias Incident’ at Williams College

Using Pink and Blue to Denote Sex Declared ‘Bias Incident’ at Williams College

“the school has declared a number of things to suddenly be horrible”

The left in academia is doing its part to completely erase traditional gender roles.

PJ Media reports:

Williams College Declares Using Pink and Blue To Denote Sex Is a ‘Bias Incident’

For generations, people have used pink to denote female and blue to denote male. This is especially handy with babies, since babies’ faces aren’t yet distinguishable as feminine or masculine.

Apparently, this convention now constitutes a “bias incident” at Williams College.

You see, the school has declared a number of things to suddenly be horrible, and one of these things is using pink and blue to denote feminine or masculine. In fact, the school referred to such things as “abhorrent and intolerable.”

According to The College Fix, other abhorrent and intolerable things at Williams College now include “[t]elling someone they have to wear pants because they are male and a skirt because they are female,” and “imitating someone’s cultural norm or practice.”

Now, the first one can be a jerk move. The context matters — but an 18-year-old can be expected to know how to match appropriate clothing to the appropriate situation, for goodness’ sake. And how to not be a jerk who lectures others on their outfits.

It’s the “imitating someone’s cultural norm or practice” that’s the more alarming of the two.

After all, that could describe anything from eating a taco to performing a minstrel show. The idea of “bias incidents” may have a legitimate function: after all, there are real racists and sexists floating around in the world being awful, and I understand the college’s desire to minimize students’ exposure to that.

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Comments

For generations, people have used pink to denote female and blue to denote male.

Not that many generations. The custom only goes back to the 1940s.

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