When I saw the tweeted outrage from the perpetually outraged about the Center for Disease Control (CDC)’s upcoming panel on the “Public Health Response to a Nuclear Detonation,” I rolled my eyes and thought “here they go again.”

After all, earlier this week, North Korea’s Kim Jong Un threatened the U. S. with a nuclear strike on our “entire” mainland.  No one really knows how crazy Un is.  Unlike his grandfather and father before him, he’s never known a time when his family wasn’t ruling over North Korea with an iron fist.

He appears to believe the fawning “love” of his subjects is real, and he’s demonstrated considerable barbarity and expressed his belief that Americans think of nothing but destroying North Korea (when we’re not eating snow because we are so poverty-stricken).  Oh, and he “sentenced” President Trump to death for insulting North Korea.  Or something.

He’s unpredictable, full to the brim with hubris, and appears to be not only cruel but more than a bit unhinged.  While we would hope that he’s not so foolhardy as to follow through with his threat, we can’t know what is going on in his mind or how much of his own state’s propaganda he’s internalized about the “weakness” of the United States.

Setting up a briefing on public safety should there be a North Korean nuclear attack on America is just good sense. The CDC’s briefing is responsible and addresses something that—while a remote possibility—is at least in the realm of reality.

Remember the Obama-era DHS squandering taxpayer money on planning and preparation exercises for a zombie apocalypse? By contrast, the CDC’s conference on public safety in the event of a nuclear strike is reasonable and defensible.

CBS reports:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has scheduled a briefing for later this month to outline how the public can prepare for nuclear war.

“While a nuclear detonation is unlikely, it would have devastating results and there would be limited time to take critical protection steps. Despite the fear surrounding such an event, planning and preparation can lessen deaths and illness,” the notice about the Jan. 16 briefing says on the CDC’s website. . . .

. . . . The notice went on to say that most people don’t know that sheltering in place for at least 24 hours is “crucial to saving lives and reducing exposure to radiation.”

Two of the people presenting at the briefing specialize in radiation studies. Robert Whitcomb is the chief of the radiation studies branch at the CDC’s National Center for Environment Health and Capt. Michael Noska is the radiation safety officer and senior advisor for health physics at the Food and Drug Administration.

This comes amid rising tensions between the U.S. and North Korea. President Trump tweeted Tuesday night, boasting about the size of his “nuclear button” and how it’s “much bigger & more powerful” than North Korea’s.

“North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un just stated that the Nuclear Button is on his desk at all times.’ Will someone from his depleted and food starved regime please inform him that I too have a Nuclear Button, but it is a much bigger & more powerful one than his, and my Button works!” Mr. Trump tweeted.

Both former Vice President Joe Biden and Admiral Mike Mullen have said in recent days that they worry the U.S. has never been closer to nuclear war with North Korea.

In response to which, the left immediately went into meltdown mode on Twitter.

That mushroom cloud is ominous, and I thought it was another media ploy to create hysteria among the “resist we much” crowd.  But no.

Upon going to the CDC’s website to examine the announcement, I was horrified.  Not only is the announcement itself among the most poorly-written garbage I’ve seen on a government website (and that’s saying something), but there was a photo of a mushroom cloud accompanying the release.  I couldn’t believe my eyes, but yep, there it is, a mushroom cloud.

https://www.cdc.gov/cdcgrandrounds/archives/2018/January2018.htm

My degrees aren’t in communications or public relations, but common sense goes a long way.  Publishing that image along with the notice of the panel discussion on nuclear detonation was a mistake, one that should never have happened.

Let’s leave the fear-mongering to the left, please.  If nothing else, it is hard to revel in their meltdowns when they aren’t entirely alarmist lunacy.