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Fraternity at Harvard Decides to go Gender Neutral

Fraternity at Harvard Decides to go Gender Neutral

“Our chapter has long debated the issues of gender inclusion”

Can a fraternity still call itself a fraternity if it’s gender neutral?

The Harvard Crimson reports:

Alpha Epsilon Pi to Go Gender Neutral

Members of the Harvard chapter of national fraternity Alpha Epsilon Pi will disaffiliate from the organization and form a new, gender neutral social group, undergraduate chapter president Jake Ascher ’19 announced Tuesday.

The Eta Psi chapter of AEPi is the first of Harvard’s nine Greek organizations to go co-ed following the announcement of Harvard’s historic penalties on members of unrecognized single-gender social organizations. The College’s policy will bar undergraduate members of these groups—starting with the Class of 2021—from certain leadership positions, athletic captaincies, and postgraduate fellowships.

In a written statement released to The Crimson Tuesday, current members of the chapter announced they had “voted to become a gender neutral organization” and will hold a gender-neutral rush next fall. In order to do so, the group has been forced to disaffiliate from AEPi’s national organization.

“Beginning next semester our rush process will be open to all Harvard undergraduates, regardless of gender identity,” the statement reads. “Our chapter has long debated the issues of gender inclusion and neutrality, but the announcement of the sanctions certainly spurred our decision,” it continues.

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Comments

They must have already been gender neutered.

Not too bright, are they?

In doing this, they are simply complying by the Harvard Administration’s threats to penalize members of single-sex organizations. No women will likely join. Harvard has done the same thing with women’s organizations, who have been told that they only need to lie and say that they would admit men if they applied. This is clearly a limitation on freedom of association, but Harvard is a private institution, and can probably get away with it.

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