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VIDEO: I Learned More at McDonald’s Than at College

VIDEO: I Learned More at McDonald’s Than at College

Oddly enough, customers were rarely interested in my feelings.

Prager University has published a new video which is an instant classic. Haverford College student Olivia Legaspi compares her experiences as a college student to her job at McDonald’s which gave her the opportunity to attend college and explains why her job was more educational.

Legaspi suggests that when she was working at McDonald’s, there were no trigger warnings before irate customers complained to her and no safe spaces to which she could retreat.

She correctly explains that if she complained to her boss that the fast pace of her work made her uncomfortable, he would have handed her a final paycheck and showed her to the door.

She also speaks at length about the problem solving skills and self reliance she took away from her job at the restaurant and that she appreciated the opportunity to acquire those skills.

In other words, Olivia Legaspi is exactly the type of young person you would want to hire if you were an employer.

Here’s the video description from Prager University:

Can working at McDonald’s better prepare a young adult for life than attending college? For Haverford undergraduate Olivia Legaspi, college taught her that her feelings are more important than anything; but working at McDonald’s she learned that serving others comes first. Which of those lessons is more important? Olivia Legaspi explains.

Watch the whole thing below:

This young woman has a bright future. Despite a bad economy, people like Legaspi are usually able to find work due to their professional attitude and work ethic.

Other Millennials would be wise to follow her example.

Featured image via YouTube.

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Comments

Instant classic?

The video is encouraging….until you read some of the comments on Youtube.

It seems to go *whoosh* right over the head of a lot of the commenters.

Rinardman
For most leftists, work ,in any form, is the ultimate four letter word.

2nd Ammendment Mother | August 3, 2016 at 9:48 am

My oldest daughter has a masters and her dream job as the staff psychologist in a women’s shelter. 20% of her day is spent using her psychology degree and 80% is spent using her management, public speaking and organizational skills she learned thru 4-H and working her way through college at mostly non-traditional jobs.

Similar story with the rest of my kids!

legacyrepublican | August 3, 2016 at 9:55 am

On the flip side, applying what she said to being a student as the customer, she can’t yell, complain, or be given the benefit of the doubt these days at almost all universities these days because student free speech and conduct is so regulated by the provider.

Unless, of course, she is a die hard leftest and a communist.

    UnCivilServant in reply to legacyrepublican. | August 3, 2016 at 10:17 am

    They don’t actually have free speech either, because while they can loudly proclaim the party line all they want, if they deviate, they incur even worse wrath. Progressivism has more hate for the apostate than the infidel.

Wow. Superb young woman. Perchance does she want to go to medical school? I’ll be happy to help her out.

A wonderful colleague of mine, an MD-PhD who runs a large, successful academic research program and specialty medical practice, said that everything she needed to learn to be a physician, other than the medical stuff, she learned as a waitress as a restaurant.

Scheduling. Being on time. Smiling at all times. Handling adversity. Getting things right. Fixing things that go wrong. Tolerating others. Handling ill tempered people. Handling getting stiffed. Taking joy in the small, good things that happen. Learning to do a job well and to be respected for it.

Timeless lessons. You don’t necessarily learn these in school.

I wish she applied at my quick service restaurant.

One of the many reasons lefties want to raise the minimum wage is to price out entry level teens, so that they don’t gain the valuable life experience, maturity, and glimpse into real-world economics that working a job (sometimes) produces. If they can reduce the number of young people who benefit from developing a solid work ethic, they gain potential lifelong voters.

I’ll wager this young lady isn’t in any “________ Studies” major.

She needs to sue McDonalds to install safe spaces for employees and to require customers to use trigger warnings. Even if this drives away customers, it is her right to be safe and secure wherever she is. This right is in the penumbra of the constitution. /sarcoff

In this article, a womyn (who else refers to a type of shoe as “flats”) gets taught a hard lesson about working a REAL job:
http://www.askamanager.org/2016/06/i-was-fired-from-my-internship-for-writing-a-proposal-for-a-more-flexible-dress-code.html

    RodFC in reply to LCVRWC. | August 3, 2016 at 5:15 pm

    I remember interviewing for the first time for real jobs. We were nearly done and the interviewer asked if I had any questions. I asked what the dress code was. He flipped out and started complaining about others who asked the same question. I knew that I wasn’t going to get the job. It was funny, because the only reason I asked was that no matter what I was going to get a new wardrobe and I needed to know what kind.

    The interviewer was a guy from Arthur Anderson who was hired to bring their IT staff up to snuff. Since then I learned that AA’s biggest business is defending it against customer suits for badly under-performing. At one of the places I worked, a manager who used to work at AA decided to gives us a pep talk, part of the pep talk was an anecdote from when he worked at AA. He basically admitted in that anecdote, he and AA committed mail fraud.

    In my area of expertise, the rule is that interns get given the jobs no one wants, get paid very little, and in exchange get experience. That experience is not just a line on a resume, but a thousand little things that they learn that engineers need to know. How to measure, how to learn your tools, how to read and write documentation. Dressing seems to be the last of the things they need to worry about.

    Given the nature of the persons approach though, I suspect that in this case the right thing happened. One things interns do need to learn is that if things don’t go your way the first time, then you should just shutup and do them the way you are told.

IIRC Micky D’s has made tons of millionaires out of many of their employees. They have or had a very rapid advancement program if one cared to pursue a career there and work hard.

While I agree with this woman, I also note that there are things that one should note,I see these workers take all sorts of shit these days.

Stuff they shouldn’t have to. Like people who freak because they are told they have to wait five minutes for their chicken nuggets because they have to cook a new batch.

All this talk about ‘jobs Americans won’t do’ is just so much BS. The jobs that Americans won’t do are what the Good Lord invented teenagers for – and through those jobs these teenagers learned all the things that Ms. Legaspi described, and took those life lessons into life with them.

We have since undertaken a massive Federal program to price teenagers out of the workplace, and then wonder why we are getting such abysmal results.

Minimum wage was never intended to be a living wage, and there will always be stories of some adult who is trying to survive on an unsurvivable wage. To help this one person, the entire entry-level job field has been destroyed.

What this performance seems to miss is that the school is the fry cook. The student is the customer whining about a slice of missing cheese. The school is saying exactly what McDonalds is saying: “Have it your way. If you have any problems with anything, we will make it all better, no questions asked.” At McDonalds, she learned the service end of the equation – at college, the customer end. The commenters who think this indicates failure by the college don’t seem to understand the role of the college in what is essentially a financial transaction.

    JohnMac in reply to peterkickit. | August 6, 2016 at 9:12 am

    Completely disagree. College isn’t some all-inclusive resort. It’s supposed to deliver young adults into the world, prepared to contribute to society.

Love this! We insisted our two daughters work in service to learn to deal with the public – servers in a restaurant actually. They quickly learned how their tips were directly influenced by how effectively they connected with customers. Those tips paid their half of the cost of their education. Now we’re hearing how that was a waste of money – Clinton is saying that from now on college will be free.

Now how about a refund for hard working families who paid cash for college? #tuitionjustice Petition here http://chn.ge/2b0Q997

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