Most Read
Image 01 Image 02 Image 03

California: Where Water is the New Gold

California: Where Water is the New Gold

When it comes to stealing commodities, few can top Californians for creativity and boldness.

In 1849, gold inspired a big rush to California and a whole lot of thievery.

In 2015, water has become the new gold!

Police are warning for businesses and residents to start locking up their taps. California’s drought has gotten so bad, people are stealing water.

Thieves busted the locks on the spigots at a popular Asian shopping center on Barber Lane in Milpitas, just to get their hands on what has become liquid gold.

Palo Alto resident Jason Zhur said he’s shocked it has come this far. “But water’s becoming more expensive than gas,” he said.

…Many businesses here have surveillance cameras, but apparently they weren’t a deterrent.

“I imagine it’s come to that point because water rates are going up, everything is going up, now,” said Zhur.

You can bet the thefts will increase along with the water rates, too! When it comes to stealing commodities, few can top Californians for creativity and boldness. Our copper thieves are notorious.

Vandals stole large sections of telephone wire in La Grange early Wednesday, disabling landline phone service throughout the area until 10:15 p.m., the Stanislaus County Sheriff’s Department reported.

They took the copper wiring, but also cut through a fiber optic line that knocked out 911 service to centers in Tuolumne, Mariposa and Stanislaus counties while also affecting some cell phone service.

AT&T crews worked the entire day to restore service, and Stanislaus County emergency services officials established a mobile command post, working with officials from the other counties to re-establish 911 service. The cost of repairs has not been determined.

The temptation to steal water has affected normally honest proprietors…of nudist camps!

In a case that highlights growing tensions brought on by California’s drought, the owners and two resident-employees of the Lupin Lodge nudist camp have been charged with felony conspiracy for allegedly stealing water last year from a neighboring property to keep their parched resort open.

The complaint filed by the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office on Thursday alleges that Glyn Stout, 77, his wife Lori Kay Stout, 53, Michael Buckland, 38 and John Berryessa, 49, piped water from Hendry’s Creek to the drought-affected, clothing-optional business despite numerous warnings to stop.

The four also face six misdemeanor charges, including trespassing on land managed by the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District.

Perhaps the most fascinating aspect to watch will be the impact on the super-wealthy, many of whom support the eco-activist ideals that got California to this point in the first place. When Governor Jerry Brown called for water reduction, the super-rich community of Rancho Sante Fe increased its use increased by 9 percent. As of July 1st, the new water restrictions will apply.

Under the new rules, each household will be assigned an essential allotment for basic indoor needs. Any additional usage — sprinklers, fountains, swimming pools — must be slashed by nearly half for the district to meet state-mandated targets.

Residents who exceed their allotment could see their already sky-high water bills triple. And for ultra-wealthy customers undeterred by financial penalties, the district reserves the right to install flow restrictors — quarter-size disks that make it difficult to, say, shower and do a load of laundry at the same time.

I suspect the ultra-wealthy will find a way to address this potential nuisance.

California: Where politicians impose the rules and citizens find ways to get around them!

DONATE

Donations tax deductible
to the full extent allowed by law.

Tags:

Comments

Heh. Always been a desert, always will. The illegals have pushed out the unicorns that feed their watersheds.

We dumped all the reserve water into the ocean and now have no water. HOW DID THIS HAPPEN!?

Windmills and photovoltaic farms on the beach. Pipelines crisscrossing the state. Desalinate the ocean waters and redistribute the liquid gold. Green and renewable… except for the technology, displacement, gauntlets, etc.

Paul In Sweden | June 15, 2015 at 2:00 pm

In San Francisco FY2015, a single-family residence will be charged $4.86 per unit(Ccf)for the first 4 units and then $6.52 for each additional unit of water each month.
http://sfwater.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=5031

1 cubic foot = 7.48 gallons = 62.4 pounds. 100 cubic feet = 1 Ccf (std. bill unit) = 748 gallons

100 cubic feet = 1 unit of water = 1 Ccf = 748 gallons = 624 pounds at a cost of $6.52

How the heck is it worth the time, money and possible criminal prosecution to slowly fill up tanks of water valuing less than $10 bucks per trip from a tiny spigot?

Henry Hawkins | June 15, 2015 at 2:04 pm

I had California on my bucket list, but only in pencil. I’ve now erased it.

Subotai Bahadur | June 15, 2015 at 2:21 pm

I will sit back here in Colorado, hoping that there is a way NOT to send water down the Colorado River to California for a couple of years. And sip a tall iced tea while I watch:

1) the California government find a way to create exemptions to all restrictions and penalties for Democrat donors.

2) as water becomes a boot-leggable substance, expect the
“undocumented-new-higher-status-citizens-to-be” to engage in criminal conduct to steal and sell it. Being “undocumented-new-higher-status-citizens-to-be”, they will be immune from arrest, prosecution, or official notice as they go about this business.

3) those not in those categories will be squeezed even harder.

4) I might even get to watch a real life replay of a classic movie scene:

http://tinyurl.com/ongqj7b

Paul In Sweden | June 15, 2015 at 2:35 pm

If the EPA was serious about doing something useful instead of enacting new laws to regulate water filled pot holes in your driveway they would be working on:

I have been waiting for years to see Aquifer Recharge (AR) and Aquifer Storage & Recovery (ASR) put into over drive for times of drought. It does not seem that drought is a serious enough consideration for anything other than lip service.

Other than updating a few pages in 2009, it does not look to me that the EPA has done anything productive on this matter.

Artificial aquifer recharge (AR) is the enhancement of natural ground water supplies using man-made conveyances such as infiltration basins or injection wells. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a specific type of AR practiced with the purpose of both augmenting ground water resources and recovering the water in the future for various uses.

This pages explains general use of AR/ASR and the how the EPA UIC program regulates these injection activities to protect underground sources of drinking water (USDWs).

Artificial aquifer recharge (AR) is the enhancement of natural ground water supplies using man-made conveyances such as infiltration basins or injection wells. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a specific type of AR practiced with the purpose of both augmenting ground water resources and recovering the water in the future for various uses.
This page explains general use of AR/ASR and the how the EPA UIC program regulates these injection activities to protect underground sources of drinking water (USDWs).

http://water.epa.gov/type/groundwater/uic/aquiferrecharge.cfm#inventory

    Insufficiently Sensitive in reply to Paul In Sweden. | June 15, 2015 at 3:56 pm

    I have been waiting for years to see Aquifer Recharge (AR) and Aquifer Storage & Recovery (ASR) put into over drive

    Oh, good. Someone with The Solution.

    You do know that California’s water use is mainly agricultural, right? And that irrigation water put into the ground goes directly back to recharge the aquifer beneath, right? Of course, excepting the water that plants transpire back into the atmosphere to recharge the clouds for new rainstorms.

    Or are you proposing that all California’s sewage treatment plants be upgraded to potable water discharge, so that THEIR product goes into the aquifers? Do the Swedes drink their recycled sewage?

Good Lord, it’s the movie “Rango” come to life, but with no in-over-his-head-actor-turned-hero to save the day.

Or Clint Eastwood. 😉

Hmmm. What would be different if this was all part of a plan to create crises/chaos? The efforts toward ruin seem more focused than any plan for recovery.

In Moonbeam’s first turn at Governor, he made a point of blocking nearly all pending water projects, most of which had begun over a decade before under his father. Had they been constructed as planned, droughts would not have this effect now.

Then the insane application of the Endangered Species Act to protect the Delta smelt and other useless bait fish made it impossible to construct new dams and reservoirs, leaving the state hostage to the weather.

– –

Liberal ideas: Because if we go back to the Stone Age, we won’t have a Carbon Footprint.

Can’t they just drink bottled water?

How long before people copy Manuel “Mannie” Garcia O’Kelly-Davis and start tapping the water lines before the meters?
It’s not that hard if you know what you are doing and almost impossible to detect.

Font Resize
Contrast Mode
Send this to a friend