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NYC considers decriminalizing public urination

NYC considers decriminalizing public urination

The situation could get sticky.

A vital debate is taking place in New York City right now. According to Seth Barron of City Journal, the City Council is considering the decriminalization of minor crimes:

Who Needs Quality of Life, Anyway?

Last week, the New York City Council announced that it was preparing legislation to reduce the penalties for a host of “minor crimes.” Open urination, drinking alcohol in public, riding bikes on the sidewalk, and other public-order infractions like subway fare-beating would no longer be considered criminal violations but rather civil offenses, akin to parking near a crosswalk. Instead of receiving a summons to appear in court, violators could pay a fine through the mail.

Proponents offer a simple explanation for why the changes are necessary: the negative effect that interaction with the criminal justice system has on those who receive summonses. Council Member Jumaane Williams has separately bemoaned the arrest of people for “minor infractions” in the subway on the grounds that “an arrest can cause significant stress” for the arrestee, as well as imposing “financial hardship.”

The public urination proposal is turning into something of a pissing contest among politicians:

Public Advocate Letitia James and Comptroller Scott Stringer, two of the top elected officials in New York City, agreed today that public urination should remain a criminal offense–breaking with their fellow Democrat, Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito.

Ms. Mark-Viverito proposed on Monday that the city should decriminalize minor offenses like urinating outdoors, drinking in public and turnstile hopping. While Police Commissioner Bill Bratton initially criticized the proposal, he is reportedly in talks with the speaker to decriminalize, among other offenses, drinking in public–but not urination.

“We lived in a city not that long ago where the smell of urine was so prevalent in some of our economically challenged communities, people felt they were afraid to go out at night and I just think we should enforce the law fairly but keep in mind we have to have some laws,” Mr. Stringer told reporters outside City Hall. “I think we should proceed with caution. I am very proud of our low crime rate.”

Barron has written before about the city council before, calling them far left:

Council of Crackpots

De Blasio’s victory has quickly given him a national profile as one of liberalism’s standard-bearers, and he appears to have broader ambitions. Realizing any such aspirations will depend, of course, on how he performs as mayor, but de Blasio came into office with an advantage that his recent predecessors lacked: overwhelming support in the city council, whose members, as one lawmaker put it, are like a “cult of true believers,” eager to follow their leader.

Mayor de Blasio may be a progressive, but he doesn’t agree on the issue of transit fare.

Matthew Chayes of Newsday:

Mayor Bill de Blasio not willing to decriminalize transit-fare evasion

Mayor Bill de Blasio, whose aides are negotiating with the City Council over its proposal to decriminalize some petty crimes, suggested Wednesday that he is unwilling to budge on transit-fare evasion.

At an impromptu news conference at the City Hall gates, Bill de Blasio said that arresting people for turnstile jumping is the centerpiece of “broken-windows” policing — the focus on small crimes to prevent larger ones — which he and his NYPD commissioner say is essential for crime control.

“I’ve made the point that fare evasion should not be looked at too lightly,” de Blasio said. “We have often found in the case of fare evasion that the individuals who attempt fare evasion have outstanding warrants or have weapons on them.”

Maybe this is also one of the reasons de Blasio objects:

MTA fares, tolls can go up 15 percent if agency isn’t bailed out

Straphangers, start saving now.

Millions of commuters could soon get hit with a 15% fare and toll hike if the state Legislature doesn’t bail out the debt-ridden agency, a top transit official warned Monday.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s $32 billion, five-year capital budget plan to pay for serious fixes and updates is only half-funded.

Featured image via Wikimedia Commons.

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Comments

Oh, if Frank were still around…

Start spreading the news
I am going today
I want to pee in part of it
New York, New York

    Not A Member of Any Organized Political in reply to JerryB. | May 4, 2015 at 1:34 pm

    Frank you can start in the mayor’s office,

    Next the mayor’s home….

    Then on the mayor’s car……

    Then….

It should be pointed out that the mayor has no control at all over the MTA. It sets its fares independently, and it doesn’t care whether he approves or not.

It should also be obvious that fare evasion is not in the same category as taking a leak in an alley, or against a tree, when one is caught short. Nobody has to jump a turnstile; if you haven’t got the fare, don’t ride the subway. Turnstile-jumping is stealing, and that is always a deliberate decision. But really, what is someone supposed to do when they have to go, and they’re not near any public facilities? Especially at night, when stores are closed, and so are the facilities in parks? Holding it in isn’t always an option, especially for older people and children; and even when it’s technically possible it can be dangerous. Is it really fair that it’s a crime for which one can be imprisoned and get a criminal record?

    Estragon in reply to Milhouse. | May 4, 2015 at 12:04 am

    Decent people and their children seem to manage to find facilities, and always have.

      MarkS in reply to Estragon. | May 4, 2015 at 6:11 am

      “Decent people” certainly can find facilities by dropping in establishments such as The Plaza or similar, where the unbathed homeless might find admission difficult.

        JPL17 in reply to MarkS. | May 4, 2015 at 9:04 am

        I work in NYC. For every Plaza-like establishment there, there are at least 2 dozen McDonald’s-like establishments and numerous public rest rooms. There’s NO reason to turn the city into a public urinal.

          MarkS in reply to JPL17. | May 4, 2015 at 9:29 am

          I have on more than once seen what appeared to be a homeless type physically removed from the McDonalds at Union Square for his unappetizing aroma.

          JPL17 in reply to JPL17. | May 4, 2015 at 10:01 am

          Response to MarkS:

          So what??? Did they kick such individuals out before or *after* they used the McDonald’s *restroom*?

          Obviously, you have no idea, so your anecdotes are pointless.

          MarkS in reply to JPL17. | May 4, 2015 at 10:45 am

          response to jpl17- Relax, for chrissakes! nobody’s supporting public pissing, just pointing out that those most likely to do so aren’t able to access restrooms in private business establishments…and since you asked the ejections took place within 10 feet of entering. And since you seem to know and since i’m heading to nyc and don’t want to pollute, just where are all these public restrooms you reference?

          Milhouse in reply to JPL17. | May 4, 2015 at 8:25 pm

          Oh yeah? What do you do when you’re caught short in a residential area, or in an area where all the stores are closed?

          JPL17 in reply to JPL17. | May 4, 2015 at 10:39 pm

          Response to Millhouse:

          “What do you do when you’re caught short in a residential area, or in an area where all the stores are closed?”

          Obviously, in that situation, you do what everyone else does: You BREAK THE FRICKIN’ LAW.

          But that’s NO reason to make it lawful for you to pee WHEREVER you want, WHENEVER you want.

          Milhouse in reply to JPL17. | May 5, 2015 at 2:13 am

          Obviously, in that situation, you do what everyone else does: You BREAK THE FRICKIN’ LAW.

          And in NYC, if a cop happens to pass by and see you, you go to jail and are convicted of a crime. Is that just? Is that right? That is what this initiative is about; preventing you and me from becoming criminals for life, just because we were caught short and did what we needed to do. That should not be a crime.

          Milhouse in reply to JPL17. | May 5, 2015 at 2:15 am

          Oh, and by the way, nobody has suggested making it lawful “to pee wherever you want, whenever you want”. Where on earth did you get that cockamamie idea? The only proposal is to decriminalize it, not to make it lawful.

      JPL17 in reply to Estragon. | May 4, 2015 at 12:56 pm

      Response to MarkS — #1, just off the top of my head, I can think of the very large public restrooms in Penn Station, Port Authority Bus Terminal, Grand Central Station and Bryant Park.

      #2, based on publicly-available information, there appear to be many hundreds of public bathrooms in Manhattan alone, including those located in private establishments. See, e.g., http://www.nyrestroom.com/

      #3, about 140 public restrooms in Manhattan alone are operated by the City Parks Department, including:

      Abe Lincoln Abraham Lincoln Playground
      East 135 Street, between Madison & 5 avenues

      Alexander Hamilton Playground Alexander Hamilton Playground
      Hamilton Place, West 140 to West 141 streets

      Alfred E. Smith Park Alfred E. Smith Playground
      Catherine Slip, Madison & South streets

      Alice Kornegay Triangle Alice Kornegay Triangle
      Lexington Avenue, East 128 & East 129 streets

      Annunciation Park Annunciation Park
      Convent and Amsterdam Av, W 135 St

      Asser Levy Asser Levy Playground
      Asser Levy Place & East 24-25 streets

      Audubon Playground Audubon Playground
      West 170 Street & Audubon Avenue

      Augustus St. Gaudens Augustus St. Gaudens Playground
      East 19 to East 20 streets, 2 Avenue

      Bendheim Playground Central Park
      100th Street and Fifth Ave

      Bennett Park Bennett Park
      West 185 Street, Ft Washington Avenue

      Bleecker Playground Bleecker Playground
      Hudson & West 11 streets

      Bloomingdale Playground Bloomingdale Playground
      Amsterdam Avenue, West 104 & West 105 streets

      Broadway Malls Broadway Malls
      Broadway, Columbus Circle to West 110 Street

      Carl Schurz Park Carl Schurz Park
      East 84 Street & East End Avenue

      Carl Schurz Promenade Carl Schurz Park
      Stone Wall to East River, East 84 to East 90 streets

      Carmansville Playground Carmansville Playground
      Amsterdam Avenue, West 151 to West 152 streets

      Central Park (Ancient Playground) Central Park
      85 ST & 5TH AVE

      Central Park (Arsenal) Central Park
      5th Avenue from 60th Street to 65th Street

      Central Park (Bethesda Terrace) Central Park
      Central Park (Conservatory Garden) Central Park
      5th Avenue, 103rd Street to 106th Street

      Central Park (Dana Discovery Center) Central Park
      110th Street between Fifth Avenue and Malcolm X Boulevard

      Central Park (Heckscher Playground) Central Park
      62 ST, BET WEST & CENTER DRS

      Central Park (Kerbs Boathouse) Central Park
      74th Street near Fifth Avenue

      Central Park (Lasker) Central Park
      Central Park at 107th Street

      Central Park (Loeb Boathouse) Central Park
      East Side between 74th and 75th streets

      Central Park (North Meadow Recreation Center) Central Park
      Mid-park at 97th Street

      Central Park (Ramble) Central Park
      Central Park (Sheep Meadow, Mineral Springs) Central Park
      Mid-park at 69th Street

      Central Park (Tavern on The Green) Central Park
      Central Park (Tennis Courts) Central Park
      93d Street near the West Drive

      Central Park (The Great Hill) Central Park
      West Side from 103rd to 107th streets

      Central Park (The Metropolitan Museum of Art) Central Park
      Fifth Avenue at 82nd Street

      Central Park (West 61st) Central Park
      West Drive, Central Park West, & 65th Street Transverse

      Central Park (Wollman Rink) Central Park
      Center Drive to East Drive (including Gapstow Bridge)

      Central Park Delacorte Comfort Station Central Park
      Mid-Park at 80th Street

      Chelsea Park Chelsea Park
      West 27 Street & 9 Avenue

      Chelsea Recreation Center Chelsea Recreation Center
      South of West 25 Street, 9 to 10 avenues

      Cherry Tree (Washington) Playground Cherry Tree Park
      99 to 100 streets, 3 Avenue

      Col. Charles Young Playground Col. Young Playground
      West 144 Street & Lenox Avenue

      Coleman Square Playground Coleman Playground
      Between Cherry & Monroe streets

      Columbus Park Columbus Park
      Baxter, Mulberry, Bayard & Worth streets

      Corporal John A. Seravalli Playground Corporal John A. Seravalli Playground
      Hudson & Horatio streets

      De Witt Clinton Park De Witt Clinton Park
      West 52 to West 54 streets, 11 to 12 avenues

      Downing Street Playground Downing Street Playground
      Downing to Carmine streets, Avenue of the Americas

      Dry Dock Playground Dry Dock Playground
      East 10 Street & Szold Place, Avenue D

      Dyckman House Museum Dyckman House Museum
      Broadway & West 204 Street

      East River Park (10th Street) John v. Lindsay East River Park
      Northern extreme of park

      East River Park (Tennis Courts) John v. Lindsay East River Park
      East River Park at Broome Street

      East River Park (Track Building) John v. Lindsay East River Park
      East 6 Street & FDR Drive

      East River Playground East River Playground
      FDR Drive, East 106 to East 107 streets

      Fort Tryon Park (Anne Loftus Playground) Fort Tryon Park
      Broadway & Dyckman Street

      Fort Tryon Park (Café) Fort Tryon Park
      One Margaret Corbin Drive

      Fort Tryon Park (The Cloisters) Fort Tryon Park
      Riverside Drive to Broadway, West 192 to Dyckman streets

      Fort Washington Park (Lily Brown Playground) Fort Washington Park
      West 162 Street, east of Riverside Drive

      Frederick Douglass Playground Frederick Douglass Playground
      West 100-101 Street Amsterdam Avenue

      Frederick E. Samuel Playground Fred Samuel Playground
      Lenox Avenue, West 139 to West 140 streets

      Frederick Johnson Park Frederick Johnson Playground
      7 Avenue, West 150-151 streets

      General Douglas MacArthur Park Macarthur Park
      East 49 Street & East River Drive

      Hamilton Fish Park (Recreation Center) Hamilton Fish Park
      Between East Houston & Stanton streets

      Hansborough Recreation Center Hansborough Recreation Center
      35 West 134 Street

      Happy Warrior Playground Happy Warrior Playground
      West 98 Street & Amsterdam Avenue

      Highbridge Park (Quisqueya Playground) Highbridge Park
      West 180 Street & Amsterdam Avenue

      Highbridge Park (Recreation Center) Highbridge Park
      West 155 & Dyckman streets, Edgecombe & Amsterdam avenues

      Highbridge Park (Wallenberg Playground) Highbridge Park
      West 188 Street & Amsterdam Avenue

      Highbridge Park-Wallenberg Playground Highbridge Park
      W 189 St & Amsterdam Ave

      Holcombe Rucker Holcombe Rucker Park
      West 155 Street, 8 Avenue to Harlem River Drive

      Howard Bennett Playground Howard Bennett Playground
      West 135 to West 136 streets, Lenox to 5 avenues

      Inwood Hill Park (Nature Center) Inwood Hill Park
      Gaelic Field and Area around Salt Marsh West of Indian Road (at 218th Street)

      Inwood Hill Park (Payson Playground) Inwood Hill Park
      Payson & Dyckman streets

      Inwood Hill Park (Tennis Courts) Inwood Hill Park
      Tennis courts & ballfields along Seaman Avenue from 207th Street to 214th Street

      J. Hood Wright Park J. Hood Wright Park
      Ft. Washington & Haven avenues, West 173 Street

      Jackie Robinson Park Jackie Robinson Park
      West 149 Street & Bradhurst Avenue

      Jackie Robinson Park (Playground One Fifty Two CLII) Jackie Robinson Park
      West 152 Street & Bradhurst Avenue

      Jackie Robinson Park (Recreation Center) Jackie Robinson Park
      Bradhurst & Edgecombe avenues,West 145 to West 155 streets

      Jacob Schiff Playground (PS 192) Jacob H. Schiff Playground
      Amsterdam Avenue, West 136 Street

      James J. Walker Park (Carmine Recreation Center) James J Walker Park
      Hudson, Leroy, Clarkson Streets, 7 Avenue

      John Jay Park & Pool John Jay Park
      East 76-East 78 streets & Cherokee Place

      Little Flower Playground Little Flower Playground
      Madison Street opposite Jefferson Street

      Marcus Garvey Park (Pelham Fritz Recreation Center) Marcus Garvey Park
      18 Mount Morris Park West

      Marcus Garvey Park (Pool) Marcus Garvey Park
      Madison Avenue, East 120 to East 124 streets

      Martin Luther King Houses Martin Luther King Playground
      Lenox Avenue, West 113 to West 114 streets

      May Matthews Playground Matthews – Palmer Playground
      West 45 Street between 9 & 10 avenues

      McCaffrey Playground Mccaffrey Playground
      West 43 Street, 8 & 9 avenues

      McKinley Playground Mckinley Playground
      Avenue A, East 3-East 4 streets

      Morningside Park Morningside Park
      West 123 Street & Morningside Avenue

      Morningside Park Morningside Park
      Athletic Fields and Lawns from 114th Street to 110th Street along Manhattan Avenue, East of Upper Path

      Morningside Playground Morningside Park
      West 117 Street & Morningside Avenue

      Msgnr. Kett Monsignor Kett Playground
      West 204 Street & Nagle Avenue

      Orville & Wilbur Playground Wright Brothers Playground
      West 156 Street & St. Nicholas Avenue

      Playground 70 Matthew P. Sapolin Playground
      West End Avenue & West 70 Street

      Playground Ninety Six (XCVI) Marx Brothers Playground
      2 Avenue, East 96 to East 97 streets

      Poor Richard’s Playground Poor Richard’s Playground
      East 109 Street between 2 & 3 avenues

      PS 155 Playground P.S. 155 Playground
      East 117 to East 118 streets, 1 to 2 avenues

      Renaissance Playground Renaissance Playground
      West 144 Street, between 7 & 8 avenues

      Riverside Park (Boat Basin) Riverside Park
      Riverside Drive to Hudson River, West 59th Street to Clair Place
      Riverside Park (Café) Riverside Park

      105th Street, next to Henry Hudson Parkway
      Riverside Park (Claremont) Riverside Park

      West 124 Street & Riverside Drive
      Riverside Park (Classic Playground) Riverside Park

      72nd to 79th streets between Hudson River and Henry Hudson Parkway
      Riverside Park (Dinosaur Playground) Riverside Park

      West 97 Street & Riverside Drive
      Riverside Park (Hippo Playground) Riverside Park
      West 91 Street & Riverside Drive

      Riverside Park (Neufeld Playground) Riverside Park
      West 76 Street & Riverside Drive

      Riverside Park (River Run Playground) Riverside Park
      West 83 Street & Riverside Drive

      Riverside Park (Riverbank Playground) Riverside Park
      West 142 Street & Riverside Drive

      Riverside Park (Ten Mile River Playground) Recreational Area
      West 148 Street & Hudson River

      Riverside Park (Tennis Courts) Riverside Park
      Riverside Drive & West 96th Street

      Robert Moses Playground Robert Moses Playground
      1 Avenue, East 41 to East 42 streets

      Roger Morris Park (Morris Jumel Mansion) Roger Morris Park
      Jumel Terrace to Edgecombe Avenue, West 160 to West 162 streets

      Sara D. Roosevelt Park Sara D. Roosevelt Park
      East Houston Street to Canal Street

      Sheltering Arms Park Sheltering Arms Playground
      West 129 Street, Amsterdam Avenue

      Sheltering Arms Park (Pool), Sheltering Arms Playground
      West 129 Street, Amsterdam Avenue

      Sol Bloom Playground Sol Bloom Playground
      Columbus Avenue, West 91 to West 92 streets, Central Park West

      Sol Lain Playground Sol Lain Plgd
      Broadway, Henry Street, Samuel Dickstein Place

      St Nicholas Park South St. Nicholas Playground South
      West 129 & 7 Avenue
      St. Catherine’s Park St. Catherine’s Park
      East 67-68 streets, 1 Avenue

      St. Nicholas Park St. Nicholas Park
      West 133 Street & St. Nicholas Avenue

      St. Nicholas Park St. Nicholas Park
      West 129 Street & St. Nicholas Terrace

      St. Nicholas Park (Arlington Edinboro Playground) St. Nicholas Park
      West 140 Street & St. Nicholas Avenue

      St. Vartan Park St. Vartan Park
      East 35-East 36 streets, between 1 & 2 avenues

      Stanley Isaacs Stanley Isaacs Playground
      East 96-97 streets & FDR Drive

      Tecumseh Playground Tecumseh Playground
      West 77 Street & Amsterdam Avenue

      The Battery (Battery Gardens) The Battery
      Battery Place, State & Whitehall streets

      The Battery Comfort Station The Battery
      Battery Place, State & Whitehall streets

      Thomas Jefferson Park Thomas Jefferson Park
      1 Avenue to FDR Drive, East 111 to East 114 streets

      Tompkins Square Park Tompkins Square Park
      Avenues A to B, East 7 to East 10 streets

      Union Square Park Union Square Park
      Broadway to 4 Avenue, East 14 Street to East 17 streets

      Vesuvio Playground Vesuvio Playground
      Spring & Thompson streets

      Wagner Pool, Wagner Houses Pool, East 124 Street between 1 & 2 Avenues

      Washington Square Park Western Half, Washington Square Park 5 Avenue, Waverly Place, West 4 & MacDougal streets.

      West 59th Street Recreation Center & Pool, Gertrude Ederle Recreation Center, West 59 to West 60 streets, Amsterdam to West End avenues

      #4, finally, I happen to know the particular McDonald’s location that you mentioned, because I work directly across Union Square from it. And I find your story about homeless people being tossed out of there, *before* they can walk more than 10 feet into it, utterly not believable. That store is too busy, too crowded with customers, too understaffed, and too deep and narrow, for the staff to react that quickly to someone just walking in.

        platypus in reply to JPL17. | May 4, 2015 at 8:30 pm

        Don’t do that again. The internet is running out of bandwidth. And if a link ain’t enough for people, what makes you think they’re smart enough to print out and carry the list around?

        And if you were just trying to be cute, well, my boys used to think it was funny to drop trou in the middle of a garden party to show everyone how they could now pee standing up (when they were two or less).

        Milhouse in reply to JPL17. | May 4, 2015 at 8:31 pm

        just off the top of my head, I can think of the very large public restrooms in Penn Station, Port Authority Bus Terminal, Grand Central Station and Bryant Park.

        Which is very nice if you happen to be in that area. You may be aware that NYC extends beyond midtown Manhattan.

        about 140 public restrooms in Manhattan alone are operated by the City Parks Department,

        And what are their hours? Not only are parks themselves closed late at night, but the public facilities therein are closed much much earlier.

        And what do you mean by “in Manhattan alone”, as if you expect them to be more common in the other boroughs? If you think so, let me disabuse you of that notion. There are plenty of places in NYC that are more than an reasonable walk from a park, let alone one with public faciilities.

          JPL17 in reply to Milhouse. | May 4, 2015 at 10:18 pm

          “You may be aware that NYC extends beyond midtown Manhattan.”

          Are you stupid? This is a serious question. Are you stupid?

          Answer me. Are you stupid?

          Because just as NYC extends beyond Manhattan, NYC restrooms also extend beyond Manhattan.

          Yes. More city. More restrooms.

          Idiot.

          Milhouse in reply to Milhouse. | May 5, 2015 at 2:18 am

          No, they don’t. Large public restrooms, open 24/7, such as exist at Penn Station, Port Authority Bus Terminal, Grand Central Station and Bryant Park, do not exist in most of NYC.

…“an arrest can cause significant stress” for the arrestee, as well as imposing “financial hardship.”

*slowly shakes head*

How can you not feel sorry for someone that dumb?

This doesn’t seem nuts — even if the reasons given are.

What’s the point of wasting the time of a Judge, a court reporter, a bailiff, and all the rest of the cost of a court appearance over a pay-a-fine misdemeanor?

    clintack in reply to clintack. | May 3, 2015 at 9:54 pm

    Even just on a cost-benefit analysis, what’s the benefit of spending thousands of dollars in overhead to collect a hundred dollar fine?

      MarkS in reply to clintack. | May 4, 2015 at 6:15 am

      I guess when public peeing becomes a public health issue.

        Milhouse in reply to MarkS. | May 4, 2015 at 8:33 pm

        How can urine be a public health issue? It’s sterile.

        platypus in reply to MarkS. | May 4, 2015 at 8:36 pm

        Seriously? What about all the walking disease incubators that are demanding to be married? We ignore THEIR impact on public health and the public treasury which is a lot more serious than peeing in public.

        Please get real – peeing in public just ain’t the biggest deal we have.

      peg_c in reply to clintack. | May 4, 2015 at 9:15 am

      When tourists decide to spend their dollars elsewhere? I live 70 miles north but NYC is the very last place I’d go these days. The people there are beyond disgusting and public urination is only a small part of it.

        Not A Member of Any Organized Political in reply to peg_c. | May 4, 2015 at 1:31 pm

        Toronto and Montreal are very nice cities to visit and really experience what “metropolitan” used to mean.

        They have been taking vacation and convention dollars away New York City in a big way already for the past couple of decades.

        Milhouse in reply to peg_c. | May 4, 2015 at 8:34 pm

        You think people don’t pee in alleys and against trees in Toronto or Montreal?!

I’m all for peeing on NYC.

The last time I was in NYC it positively reeked of urine. This is only facing the truth of what is already happening.

To bad for Eric Garner they couldn’t be bothered to legalize selling single cigarettes. I guess they couldn’t figure out a way of taxing pee.

    Estragon in reply to jim_m. | May 4, 2015 at 12:07 am

    You might feel less sympathy for the loosie sellers if your living depended on your store, on which you paid all your taxes, but Garner and his like on the sidewalk outside with all his thuggish customers, including crackheads and hookers, drove away your paying customers.

    ecreegan in reply to jim_m. | May 4, 2015 at 12:59 am

    As long as it remains illegal to sell cigarettes to minor children, cigarette sales need to be restricted to locations known to the police.

    MarkS in reply to jim_m. | May 4, 2015 at 6:19 am

    Hey Jim-m, better give Ragspierre a trigger warning before mentioning Eric Garner!

    Milhouse in reply to jim_m. | May 4, 2015 at 8:35 pm

    The ban on selling single cigarettes is federal law, and has nothing to do with tax collection.

      Barry in reply to Milhouse. | May 5, 2015 at 12:28 am

      “and has nothing to do with tax collection.”

      It has everything to do with tax collection.

        Milhouse in reply to Barry. | May 5, 2015 at 2:19 am

        No, it doesn’t. That is simply a matter fact, and you are not entitled to your own facts.

Ah, this is necessary since it makes US more like Europe, the source of everything wise, smart, and chic at least to our very own US Intelligentsia. When overseas in 1958, it wasn’t uncommon to see a guy lean against a building and whiz away. Saw that in Ankara, Istanbul, Naples, and elsewhere over there in the wonderful land. Yes, Spring was in the air, as was a stink.

Of course, also, our medical doctors saw fecal matter in their optical scopes so all our water came from artisan wells, heavily chlorinated too. Turns out, as long as a guy was outdoors, in the country, dumps would be taken everywhere, when the need arose.

Ah, Europe, so grand, why can’t we be more like them, eh?

legacyrepublican | May 3, 2015 at 10:36 pm

I thought limiting the size of drinks would have alleviated the need to pee.

Bruce Hayden | May 3, 2015 at 10:55 pm

What could possibly go wrong there? Giving homeless people citations that they are supposed to mail in? Or, even the less affluent, esp. minorities. What do you do when they blow off the citations? Haul them in anyway? Or just give them another citation for blowing off the previous one?

Seriously, if their argument is “Financial hardship causing stress, “Council Member Jumaane Williams has separately bemoaned the arrest of people for “minor infractions” in the subway on the grounds that “an arrest can cause significant stress” for the arrestee, as well as imposing “financial hardship.”,

then fining people under a civil code won’t fix the problem, even according to their own logic.

We’re doomed unless people start thinking about their actions, and their consequences, before committing them.

Oh, you just had to go there.

(I’m sorry, it just came out.)

Leave it to a leftist oaf to turn the NYC Rudy Gulliano tamed back into the sh-thole it was in 70s – just like another leftist oaf has turned the America that Ronald Reagan tamed back into the sh-hole it was in the 70s.

It takes a leftist oaf mere seconds to destroy what it took for a conservative years to build.

Given the toilet De Oafio just turned NY into, it’d be nice to walk another oaf named Boehner through NY streets with a sign on his back reading, “Piss Here.”

Eastwood Ravine | May 4, 2015 at 1:31 am

He’s quite an idiot, but deBlasio will do one thing correctly: lose to a Giuliani-like politician who will clean up and tame NYC again.

Empress Trudy | May 4, 2015 at 9:35 am

Our long national nightmare is finally over.

Giuliani recognized that cleaning up petty items would impact the overall crime rate and it did. When minor items are OK, then major ones don’t seem so serious. This is a step in the wrong direction.

As for the MTA fares, city residents should pay the cost of a ride, not be subsidized by rural and suburban residents. They don’t even come close to paying what it costs for a subway ride. Meanwhile, motorists pay subsidies in gas taxes, there is an MTA tax in the metro NY area, tolls into and out of NYC are ridiculously high. But mass transit riders think they should not have to pay the actual cost of their rides. Fares should go to where they cover actual costs without subsidy.

BrokeGopher | May 4, 2015 at 11:33 am

If this passes, I’m going to pee on the New York Times. Who’s with me?

Back in 2009, when the WA legislature set out to pass a bill making defecation on a public bus a crime, Lt. Nixon made a heart-felt plea on behalf of the homeless:
http://ltnixonrants.blogspot.com/2009/01/first-they-came-for-bus-shitters.html

Then Are We Lumberjacks came up with an inspired solution to the problem of inaccessible public bathrooms:
http://arewelumberjacks.blogspot.com/2009/02/are-you-getting-this-camera-guy.html

NYC is not the first city to deal with a problem arising from misplaced empathy/sympathy. They just don’t have the genius Lumberjack showed in figuring out what to do.

Gremlin1974 | May 4, 2015 at 8:08 pm

I don’t see what the big deal is, liberals have been pissing in this city for years anyway.

JPL17: File MarkS under: CANNOT Possibly Make This S*** Up!!

His vapid argument really PISSES me off. In public.

This will be what Commie Bill brings to the city. Rudy cleaned up Times Square and made it safe. Commie Bill made it okay to pee anywhere. What a legacy, that is over and above his cop hating agenda.

“Instead of receiving a summons to appear in court, violators could pay a fine through the mail.”

It is all about the money.

President Not Sure | May 6, 2015 at 4:18 pm

Maybe they can put pisspots next to the trash bins? Or maybe gives these out at the shelters with dinner?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUP3PMLdoOs

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