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Legal Insurrection Straw Poll

Legal Insurrection Straw Poll

Everyone else is doing it, why not here?

Run two ways, based on currently declared candidates, and a second time with Palin and Christie in the race.  Please vote twice, it’s legal!

Polls close 9 a.m. Eastern on Monday.



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[…] Administration, never having held office is very arguably a feature. Update II: Cain also rocking Legal Insurrection straw poll.Category: Celebrities, Herman CainComments A.MenSame old racism — Morgan […]

Oh…I can vote twice, but not three times? I’ve been dienfranchised! SHAME! SHAME!!!

Was that good?

Is anyone besides me basking in the rich glorious irony of simultaneously being reported in the headlines one black man (Freeman) accusing white people of wanting another black man (Obama) out of office because he is black, while white people are rallying behind another black man (Cain) to possible win the GOP primary to possibly be the black man to replace the other black man currently in the oval office? The irony is further solidified by the fact that Morgan Freeman is unwittingly referring to the same white people that I am. This is philosophically and mathematically impossible. They are in-fact mutually exclusive. You can not want one person to be gone because he is black if you are willing to replace him with a different person who is black. To a conservative I may be stating the obvious—but look how virulently the left really believes this racism mantra. The truth is simple—I want Obama gone because he is liberal and I would support Cain if he wins the primary because he is conservative. Period. Imagine the demographic implications if we had two black men as candidates for the two parties in 2012. We would see clearly that the 96% of voting blacks that voted for Obama in 2008 had nothing to do with him being black. They voted for him because of his liberal policy positions. On the contrary, it was whites that put aside their ideology and in some measure voted for Obama because of exactly that he was black. Certainly Cain would siphon 10 to 15 percent more of the black vote but the large percentage will still go to Obama as blacks have been conditioned for 50 years to vote for the party that continues to hold them back. Racism is much more an emotional ruse than it is a reality.

    MaggotAtBroadAndWall in reply to garfman. | September 25, 2011 at 12:08 pm

    Jammie Wearing Fool had the best line about the choice voters will have to make if Cain manages to get the GOP nomination. Paraphrasing:

    On one hand, voters will have as a choice a candidate who is a bright, articulate, accomplished, black man of substance. The other candidate is Barack Obama.

      Not to be too picky but the quote would be better if the word black was left out–re-read it and see if you get what I mean. It is the white politicians in the Democrat party that care about the color of their candidates skin–not the Democrat electorate. They (the elite party leaders) played up the fact that Obama was a “clean, articulate” black man more than anyone else. The blacks in the electorate would have cast their votes the same whether Obama was black or white because socialism is what they want irrespective of the candidates’ race. The sad reason we ended up with such a radical is in-fact because of racism–but not from blacks. To be true some old-school truly overt white racists may not have voted for Obama who otherwise may of voted for a democrat but largely it was white independents and conservatives that chose to ignore the radical socialist clues about Obama and wanted to jump on the “let’s make history” band wagon and truly exercised racism by casting their vote because Obama is black. But its more complicated than that because they actually were not being racist. That is my whole point–they just thought they were doing the correct racial thing. Racism is a rare abstraction that is confused by multi-culturalist as preferring what is familiar–but i digress. Notice it is almost always the left that plays the race card. That’s because minority conservatives rely on merit to get where they want to be in life and obstacles along the way are not perceived as racism–just obstacles.

      And finally, black voters did not make history by voting for Obama in 2008, their vote was cast before Obama was a gleam in Hillary’s eye–but they will make post-modern history the first time they vote anywhere above 15% for a conservative. And maybe–just maybe, that will happen if Herman Cain gets the GOP nomination.

I’m trying to imagine a Palin/Cain 2012 ticket. Or is that racist?

    tiger66 in reply to Viator. | September 25, 2011 at 11:05 am

    That’s a good one (that would keep a lot of people up at night). Diabolical . . .

    janitor in reply to Viator. | September 25, 2011 at 4:08 pm

    Can a woman win. Is there a poll somewhere. And is she in the race.

    Beyond that: no one is a bigger fan of Sarah Palin than I am. But if Cain is on the ticket (and it looks like that could be a good idea), won’t he have to be balanced out with someone who has some kind of foreign policy or national government experience? Who would that be? I don’t see that person in the field. Which means that talk of Cain as VP might not be viable. He might have to be top of the ticket or nothing, so that the VP pick could fill in the perceived weak areas.

For the first poll, I went with Gary Johnson, who as an elected Governor of one of our 57 states should have always been in the debates (especially if low-polling Huntsman was allowed to participate). He is the one who best represents my views. As a Palinista, there was only one choice for the second poll.

I think the results are clearly showing two things: 1) How badly Perry blew the last debate; and, 2) How much the regular voters are angered by having candidates selected for them by the establishment and the media.

    Milhouse in reply to Mutnodjmet. | September 25, 2011 at 12:38 pm

    I find it difficult to understand how someone whose first choice is Palin picks Johnson for a second choice. Are you aware of his hopelessly naive position on defense and foreign policy? When he spoke earlier this year at the Junto in NY, he professed not to understand why we had troops in Afghanistan, and what good they were doing us. When I pointed out after the speech that the last time we pulled out of Afghanistan and turned our backs on it, the Taliban took over and we were bitten on the behind, and that was the reason we weren’t making the same mistake again, he was taken aback as if he’d never heard of or considered that before; that itself speaks volumes about the level of his thinking on national defense. Then he suggested that it would be cheaper to let the Taliban take it back and then re-invade it every ten years, than to stay in the game and prevent them from taking over.

    He has the same fatal flaw as Ron Paul, which is not surprising since there’s hardly any difference between him and Paul on anything else either.

      I regret to acknowledge that you are correct about Johnson’s foreign policy.

      Afaic Bush’s grand strategy consisted of wishful thinking (ditto Obama’s), but correcting the blunders will be harder than making them was.

      Mutnodjmet in reply to Milhouse. | September 25, 2011 at 7:01 pm

      My response to you is this: My main focus for voting is the domestic economic situation. Unless we get a handle on the wild-spending and the liberty-crushing crony capitalism, our response to foreign matters will be severely hampered no matter who is in office. The reason I prefer Johnson to Paul is that Johnson actually has executive experience, being the former Governor of New Mexico. Johnson also doesn’t play well with establishment types. His small government sensibilities and non-elite tendencies make it more than logical for me to pick him with a Palin-free poll, then select Palin as my #1 choice when her name is added.

      Consider this – As governor, Johnson followed a strict small government approach. According to former New Mexico Republican National Committee member Mickey D. Barnett, “Any time someone approached him about legislation for some purpose, his first response always was to ask if government should be involved in that to begin with.”He vetoed 200 of 424 bills in his first six months in office – a national record of 48% of all legislation – and used the line-item veto on most remaining bills.

      In office, Johnson fulfilled his campaign promise to reduce the 10% annual growth of the state budget. In his first budget, Johnson proposed a wide range of tax cuts, including a repeal of the prescription drug tax, a $47 million income tax cut, and a 6 cents per gallon gasoline tax cut.

        Milhouse in reply to Mutnodjmet. | September 25, 2011 at 10:00 pm

        Unless we get a handle on the wild-spending and the liberty-crushing crony capitalism, our response to foreign matters will be severely hampered no matter who is in office.

        And unless we keep fighting the jihadists, the economy will not matter.

It’s interesting that Cain leads the first poll and he’s number two in the second poll, which is led by Palin.

I like both of them and feel they would make a heck of a strong team in the 2012 elections; even running against Obama the Invincible, The Won.

    What I thoiught was interesting was how much support Palin pulled from Cain. Yes, he’s second but he’s a poor second, about the same as Christie.

    The real lesson here — which has always been obvious from the comments — is that the Good Prof’s readership is heavily weighted towards sentimental romantics.

    Must be why I like it here.

Viator. That’s a good one. I guess that would be racist. And a Cain/Palin would be sexist. Who knew? Only the GOP could be called racist and sexist by electing the first female president with a black vice-pres, or the second black pres. with the first female vice pres.

Some of the advice to Palin has been to let everyone else knock each other, then enter at the last minute. Looks like that was, indeed, good advice.

I voted for in Poll 2; poll 1 I’ll keep to myself.

I’ve been a Cain fan for a long time. However, his “999” tax plan bothers me. Can anyone explain it better than he has to date? From my simple perspective it retains all of the double taxation evils of the current local, state and federal tax codes…just with different numbers and the addition of a highly regressive “consumption tax.”

Yes, it is better than Nancy Pelosi’s “VAT” ideas, but barely.

    utroukx in reply to Aridog. | September 25, 2011 at 12:00 pm

    cain’s 999 tax plan is a transitional process that will help prepare the public for the fairtax.

      Aridog in reply to utroukx. | September 25, 2011 at 12:22 pm

      I get the “transitional” part of it. But the “Fair Tax” as expounded being a vehicle to decrease or eliminate the IRS is absurd. If anything it will increase it. I don’t know where Cain stands on that concept. My extensive personal experience with both income and consumption taxes tells me that collecting from retailers will as hard if not harder than from income earners. Years ago the IRS gave up on collecting excise taxes from fuel retailers, opting for taxing at the wholesale level where the ultimate vendor is reimbursed for payment of the tax, and if a particular consumer is exempt, then the retailer must file for a refund based upon documentation of the exemption.

      Part of my experience was as a Dept of Army “fed” where I found almost total ignorance of the tax issues … e.g., most thought “feds” don’t have to pay such taxes. Wrong. The federal government, including the Army, is responsible for payment of those taxes unless they, too, provide documentation of exempt circumstances (such as marine use for bunker fuels). Such exemptions are best addressed up front so that the wholesaler can deduct the tax from your price and from his obligations … such as in “dyed red diesel fuel” which is exempt at all levels providing the ultimate use is not taxable. It is fairly complex when interpretation is required … many federal projects are turned over to state, local or even private operations once completed … hence the ultimate use is not exempt.

      When we were careless, even as a federal agency, we had to file quarterly returns to acquire refunds for fuels acquired retail. Presuming this makes the IRS smaller is just not true.

Polls like this tell us more about the people attracted to a particular blog than anything else. I like Cain a lot, but I’d rather see him run for the Senate or for Governor. I just don’t think he’s prepared to be on a national stage.

As for being called racist: get used to it. If you hold conservative positions on any issue, you’ll be called a racist. When I hear it, that’s when I know I’ve won an argument. When a leftie gets frustrated in a debate, ‘racist’ is their first fallback position. I like to make a point of explaining to them that if their ideas had any merit they’d be able to argue them based on facts and logic.

    nordic_prince in reply to Aarradin. | September 25, 2011 at 2:22 pm

    Indeed, any time your opponent turns an argument emotional, it’s tacit admission that you’ve got the stronger argument, and he’s lost. Why else do the dumbocrats/progressives keep on trotting out their victims of this or that supposed injustice when attempting to sway public opinion?

    Sadly, too many voters are easily snookered by such pathetic manipulation. By and large, that’s how Obama got elected in the first place – people voted by listening to their deceitful heart rather than to the voice of reason. Sure hope more people wake up in 2012.

    Rosalie in reply to Aarradin. | September 25, 2011 at 7:52 pm

    Right on!

    aguyfromjersey in reply to Aarradin. | September 25, 2011 at 10:02 pm

    Why??? He has proven that he can run a business.Now he wants to run the biggest one in the world, the US Government. What does being a Senator have to do with that. Don’t we have one of those sitting n the White House now? How’s that working out for ya?

That being said, Cain might argue he is the first real black president, based on a couple of his past comments:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7354AsuLng

Not saying I endorse Cain’s oratorical flourishes, but they will have some liberal heads explodin’ (metaphorically speaking of course) – I would subscribe more to Ta-Nehisi Coates (whom I frequently do not agree with, not surprisingly) on his “race is BS” article – its worth a read from a liberal on its increasing meaningless …

… But I’m pretty sure Harry “I’m impressed by Obama’s being light-skinned and having no Negro dialect” Reid’s comments about Obama will be replaced by something even more quoteworthy if we find the right “fly on the wall” this time around.

Aw, well, given the Straw Poll in Iowa, we can be pretty sure the effect of this one will fade in a week or two, unfortunately.

Write in for Sarah Palin

Wow! Palin is mopping up in the second poll. I love you Palin supporters—and I love Palin and will vote for her if she wins the primary. However, as ideologically driven as I consider myself to be I am still willing and able to find a modicum of balance between my own ideology and someone else’s elect-ability. Sorry, but she can’t win a national election for two reasons. Too much baggage unfairly acquired but acquired none the less and she stumbles with the English language (a confidence issue I think) in nearly every video clip I ever see of her. These aren’t necessarily road-blocks for me or you but they will be to enough others.

    jakee308 in reply to garfman. | September 25, 2011 at 12:30 pm

    If she chooses to run, watch her numbers change.

    The very people who hate her are at the root of the polls that say she can’t win. Coincidence? I don’t think so.

    Plus it’s been proven that folks will tell a pollster lies depending on what they ‘feel’ the pollster wants to hear and sometimes just based on what they ‘think’ they should say.

    2 months on the campaign trail where she can control the message even better than what she has AND be directly compared with the others that are running will bring her numbers into ‘electability’ range.

      garfman in reply to jakee308. | September 25, 2011 at 1:06 pm

      Not to be too picky but the quote would be better if the word black was left out–re-read it and see if you get what I mean. It is the white politicians in the Democrat party that care about the color of their candidates skin–not the Democrat electorate. They (the elite party leaders) played up the fact that Obama was a “clean, articulate” black man more than anyone else. The blacks in the electorate would have cast their votes the same whether Obama was black or white because socialism is what they want irrespective of the candidates’ race. The sad reason we ended up with such a radical is in-fact because of racism–but not from blacks. To be true some old-school truly overt white racists may not have voted for Obama who otherwise may of voted for a democrat but largely it was white independents and conservatives that chose to ignore the radical socialist clues about Obama and wanted to jump on the “let’s make history” band wagon and truly exercised racism by casting their vote because Obama is black. But its more complicated than that because they actually were not being racist. That is my whole point–they just thought they were doing the correct racial thing. Racism is a rare abstraction that is confused by multi-culturalist as preferring what is familiar–but i digress. Notice it is almost always the left that plays the race card. That’s because minority conservatives rely on merit to get where they want to be in life and obstacles along the way are not perceived as racism–just obstacles.

      And finally, black voters did not make history by voting for Obama in 2008, their vote was cast before Obama was a gleam in Hillary’s eye–but they will make post-modern history the first time they vote anywhere above 15% for a conservative. And maybe–just maybe, that will happen if Herman Cain gets the GOP nomination.

Palin 47% Obama 47%: Turnaround & Why Marist Poll Is No Fluke

“So, beyond reworking the numbers, how do we know that the poll is not a fluke? The easiest way to see it is not a fluke is because this surge only happened in Obama vs Palin, but not in Romney vs Obama. If it were merely growing discontent with Obama and a desire to elect a Republican, we would assume that all candidates would have surged equally or, at worst, half as much.

In reality, Palin’s 44% is 9-14 points higher than her previous efforts in any Marist poll taken this year, where her other numbers were 30% (twice), 34%, and 35%. Meanwhile, Obama was down 7 points against her, a bigger drop than against any other candidate. Compare this: Romney has seen virtually no movement. At 44% now, that is little different than his three previous numbers of 41%, 42%, and 45%. Whereas Obama had fallen 7 points against Palin, Obama has held firm at 46% in 4 straight polls against Romney. So why would the Obama-Romney match-up remain the same for 4 test cycles while Palin closes a 21-pont gap?”

http://pollinsider.com/2011/09/21/palin-47-obama-47-turnaround-why-marist-poll-is-no-fluke/

McClatchy-Marist Poll Reports:

Registered voters, independents:
Sarah Palin – 47%
Barack Obama – 43%
Undecided – 10%

http://maristpoll.marist.edu/wp-content/misc/usapolls/US110913/2012/Complete%20September%2021,%202011%20USA%20McClatchy-Marist%20Poll%20Release%20and%20Tables.pdf?wpisrc=nl_pmfix

Left Behind: How Democrats Are Losing the Political Center

“In August of this year, Pew posed a very similar question (note to survey wonks: Pew used a five-point scale, versus six in 2005), but the results were very different. Although average voters continue to see themselves as just right of center, they now place themselves twice as far away from the Democratic Party as from the Republicans. In addition, Independents now see themselves as significantly closer to the Republican Party, reversing their perceptions of six years ago.

There’s another difference as well. In 2005, Republicans’ and Democrats’ views of their own parties dovetailed with the perceptions of the electorate as a whole. Today, while voters as a whole agree with Republicans’ evaluation of their party as conservative, they disagree with Democrats, who on average see their party as moderate rather than liberal. So when Independents, who see themselves as modestly right of center, say that Democrats are too liberal, average Democrats can’t imagine what they’re talking about.”

http://www.tnr.com/article/the-vital-center/95296/democrats-ideology-republicans-independents

Related: When Worlds Collide: Obama and Morgan Freeman get racialist while Cain “refudiates” their lies in the Florida win — and shows that this is no two-man race (despite the claims of the party elite and the media).

    To be fair– man, am I sick of being fair, but I gotta remind myself to do it– part of Cain’s success right now may come down to “other people did something stupid, disliked or are unacceptable for other reasons.”

It’s always gives me a warm feeling when I find that my opinions are shared by a majority of those I choose to be around.

Cain/Palin ?

Here’s MY prayer;

NO DEMOCRAT, NO ROMNEY(the Republican Democrat), NO PAUL (the Libertarian(?)).

Anyone ELSE is Okey dokey with me. (of course I have preferences but this is about what would best serve the country and me.)

[…] Administration, never having held office is very arguably a feature. Update II: Cain also rocking Legal Insurrection straw […]

I don’t mean to vent and go off topic, but I don’t understand the Christie result. Think of a Mike Bloomberg, the trans fat nanny. Christie is cut from the same cloth. Think of Christie Whitman. The same Big Time Party Bosses that support Christie, supported those two. If you think Perry is a softie, Chris Christie is softer.
Remember, New Jersey has the highest property taxes in the nation, an out of control pension system, the most expensive (and under performing) school system in the nation They just raised the tolls on the bridges so it cost $12.00 to leave this state ($9.50 if you pay in advance). Our choice was Jon Corzine, from Goodman fame, who promised us that he will RAISE taxes and tolls.
The man has not done anything, except yell in U-Tube clips. Maybe there is hope, but talk about inexperience, Christie is your man.

bob aka either orr | September 25, 2011 at 1:05 pm

The 999 as I understand it moves the conversation in the correct direction. It’s not perfect, but it’s a very good start.
What I like about Cain is he knows he doesn’t know it all. If you’ve got the basics, you can find — and God knows the GOP has — people with the knowledge to fill in the gaps. And Cain has the basics.
By the way, Professor, best to you in the coming new year.

Herman Cain Sings ‘God Bless America’

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJ-WTFA2vXY

Sarah Palin is the only choice for me. The only one I trust.

This indicates that Cain is a proxy for Palin.

WOW

after looking at the results of these dual polls (> 1200 votes cast in each at present)it is very clear that there is a *voters’ holding pattern* from readers of this blog, and for *whom* they are waiting to vote. Currently, only 21 people have chosen not to vote in the first poll.

A great idea from The Prof, to ask both these Qs together!

The *One* Conservatives here (and in FL?) appear to be waitng for, is due to speak to an international Forum in South Korea next month.

Here is a quote from the CNN article that initially reported about Gov Palin’s invitation to speak to world leaders in 3 weeks time:

“Palin will speak at the World Knowledge Forum in Seoul, which runs October 11 through 13.
According to organizers, the former governor will discuss “U.S. leadership perspective on how to lead the world out of the latest crisis.”

Here is my Q

Why didn’t The Mitt$ter or The Rick$ter or Ron Paul, or MinnieMe or Krispie Kreme or Mitch Daniels get invited to speak to the world about how to lead the world out of the latest crisis?

?
?
?
?
?

Perhaps the Movers and Shakers in the rest of the world (who aren’t connected to The Bilderbergers or the CFR) LIKE the American Constitutional Economic Views espoused by Gov Palin and think she is THE Leader who can deliver, thus strengthening the American Economy and therefore benefitting the rest of the world in the process – whaddya reckon?

Perhaps *they*, like *her* have read HISTORY and know what happened globally when RWR was POTUS

Perhaps they have viewed “The Undefeated” or at least researched Gov Palin’s RECORD ….. they know what she has already delivered on, IN SPITE OF fierce opposition at every turn ….

If Gov Palin is a declared POTUS candidate by the time she visits Seoul, the American Media will be compelled to report on her visit and speech …… or else be scooped by every other media outlet worldwide …. what’s the bet that CNN will send Hamby and RCP will send Conroy?

HA!

Where are you Charles of The Hammer Kraut? Is this invitation GRAVITAS-TIC enough for you?

Don’t you think you should travel to Wasilla, knock on the Palins’ door, cap-in-hand and humbly request that Fmr AK Governor Sarah Palin COME BACK INTO THE ROOM?

(you elitist DOLT!)

*__*

The order of the candidates gets scrambled when the page is refreshed. Good idea.

    William A. Jacobson in reply to gs. | September 25, 2011 at 3:29 pm

    Yes, put it on “random” selection otherwise there would be a bias towards whoever’s name was near the top.

JimMtnViewCaUSA | September 25, 2011 at 3:09 pm

Just sayin’

Herman Cain (born December 13, 1945) is an American businessman, politician, columnist, and radio host from Georgia. He is the former chairman and CEO of Godfather’s Pizza and a former deputy chairman (1992–94) and chairman (1995–96) of the board of directors to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. Before his business and economics career he worked as a mathematician in ballistics for the United States Navy.[2][3]

    While it takes talent to lead a company out of failure into profit, being a CEO of a private company where you can fire those who do not perform, it is a lot different than governing where you have other elected officials that you can’t fire.

    As a CEO, you work with those that have the same goals as you do, if not, they’re gone, fired. Replaced.

    How do you replace Congressmen that are unwilling to work with you and whose goals are in direct conflict with yours? You can’t.

    We have seen how someone governs when they have on-the-job training. It is disaster. And while I have nothing but the highest respect for Herman Cain, I would perfer that he gets experience in the field of government before being handed the most powerful position in the world.

    I am also not a fan of the fair tax. It is convoluted and what happens if a 9% sales tax is imposed federally? Are the states going to stop collecting sales tax hoping that their part of the federal sales tax will be handed back to them? We have seen how that works with federal income tax. The money is spent in D.C. and a number of states have wound up donor states, giving more than they get in return.

    I know many here are hoping for a Palin entry. But they never talk about any particular legislation she helped enact in her state, how she improved the unemployment rate in her state, how she created jobs, how she lowered taxation, all the things that we worry about. If she enters, her every action as Governor of Alaska will be examined under a magnifying glass like never before. Her ties to Sean Parnell, a lobbyist when she chose him as a running mate, will be plastered all over the front pages. I don’t want to see Sarah Palin, and her family, go through any more hardship than they already have. If she runs, everything up until now will have been child’s play.

      Milhouse in reply to retire05. | September 25, 2011 at 4:54 pm

      I know many here are hoping for a Palin entry. But they never talk about any particular legislation she helped enact in her state, how she improved the unemployment rate in her state, how she created jobs, how she lowered taxation, all the things that we worry about.

      What are you talking about? If we never talk about those things it’s because the question never comes up. But in her Vice Presidential campaign all of those things were examined with a fine-toothed comb and she came out smelling like roses. “Her every action as Governor of Alaska” has already been “examined under a magnifying glass”, especially now that nearly all the emails she sent for that entire time have been made public. Just a few months ago the press scoured through that record, trying desperately to find something juicy, and they just couldn’t.

      Her ties to Sean Parnell, a lobbyist when she chose him as a running mate, will be plastered all over the front pages.

      You say that as if “lobbyist” were a dirty word. What the hell is wrong with lobbying? It’s an activity explicitly protected by the first amendment!

        retire05 in reply to Milhouse. | September 25, 2011 at 5:58 pm

        REally, Milhouse? And it came out that she chose a lobbyist as her running mate when? What debate? What newspaper article. If that is your claim, surely you can provide links to those sources, right?

        You think a lobbyist is honorable? Whose side are you on? Oh, that’s right, Palins. And anything that is said about her, even if it is not insulting, goes against your grain.

        You Palinistas are as radical as the Paulbots in their fervor.

        So, let’s talk about some the legislation Palin signed while governor (for such a short time). Give me your examples. How about her Gardasil legislation that put the entire nation on the hook for paying for the vaccine in Alaska. But then, perhaps you don’t mind paying for the legislation of other states. I do. I don’t like being taxed to pay for county roads in New York, or some park in Chicago.

          Weirddave in reply to retire05. | September 25, 2011 at 8:12 pm

          I have a question for you that I’ll phrase this way: IF (if) Palin gets into the race and starts blowing the field away, including your beloved Gov. Perry, will you get with the program and work like hell to elect her in the general, or will you take your ball and go home? I’m curious.

          You Perry-krishnas are cultists. There, how do you like it. Go see “The Undefeated. All of your questions will be answered. Perry is too much of a democrat for me. Obviously the public feels the same way after the last debate. Perry is done. Stick a fork in him.

          Milhouse in reply to retire05. | September 25, 2011 at 10:18 pm

          And it came out that she chose a lobbyist as her running mate when? What debate? What newspaper article.

          What do you mean “came out”? When was it ever hidden? How could what he did for a living have been hidden, and why would anyone want to hide it?

          You think a lobbyist is honorable?

          Um, yes, of course it is. It’s at least as honorable as “journalist” or “lawyer” or “public servant”. The right to lobby is explicitly protected by the constitution. The framers obviously thought it an important activity.

          How about her Gardasil legislation that put the entire nation on the hook for paying for the vaccine in Alaska.

          Legislation? What legislation? The CDC offered to pay for vaccinations; what responsible governor would have said “no”? Why would anyone say “no”? Vaccinating against cancer is a good thing, and public health is what the CDC are for. But nobody forced them to make that offer; if they had decided it was too expensive they were free not to do so.

          I don’t like being taxed to pay for county roads in New York, or some park in Chicago.

          Nor do I, but we’re paying for them anyway.

          Whose side are you on? Oh, that’s right, Palins. And anything that is said about her, even if it is not insulting, goes against your grain.

          Nonsense. I’m perfectly capable of seeing her faults, and criticising her when she gets something wrong. (For instance, her suggestion that Perry’s decision-making was influenced by his former chief-of-staff’s connection to Merck was unfair, and I said so, as you will remember since you read Patterico. It wasn’t completely unfair, and it certainly wasn’t anything like Bachmann’s insane attack on him over the same issue, but on the whole I don’t think she should have said it.) However on this she was right, and there’s nothing to criticise.

          I had to register here, just to respond to your “as usual” inane drivel.
          If you would just try to do just a little fact finding, instead of just spouting your usual nonsense. You would know that the Lieutenant Governor of Alaska, is chosen through the primary process, just as the governor is. The winners of the primaries are then paired to run in the general. Sarah did not choose Sean as her running mate, he won the job.
          And as to the rest of your drivel about her accomplishments as governor, If your haven’t taken the time to learn anything about what she accomplished as governor, then you are either lazy or knowingly ignoring facts.

She’s a big girl. Actually far bigger than most give her credit for being. She knows exactly what she is in for. Who would know better? I think she will surprise a lot of people. You could get a glimmer of that in NE and Iowa.

It will be an existential moment for Sarah Heath Palin but also for the rest of us which may be one of the reasons she makes some people uncomfortable (other than the government pork-industrial complex which is petrified).

Most important will be how many step forward to be at her right hand. That decision will be for each of us our existential moment.

Sorry, Viator, never been big into existentialism.

huskers-for-palin | September 25, 2011 at 8:16 pm

Attention Omaha Area Palin Fans
==============================

Join us for a day of watching
the Sarah Palin documentary
“THE UNDEFEATED”

Saturday, October 15th, 2011
(Husker Football Bye-Week)

Ramada Hotel
3321 South 72nd Street
Omaha, NE 68124

Salon Room ” A ”
(Room can hold up to 30 people)

Show Times:
8:00am, 10:30am, 1:00pm, 3:30pm, 6:00pm, 8:30pm

Cost: Free

Door prizes

Please Email me to RSVP your desired show time (Timothy)
[email protected]

In case of a full booking for a particular time slot, an alternative time will be suggested.

Bring your friends, Independents and those opened-minded to Palin.

I would be interested in seeing the third, invisible graph of those who reloaded the page, tried to vote again, and who they tried to vote for. Add a little psychology to the mix.

[…] in the field who can attract both Ron Paul’s supporters and Herman Cain’s supporters (an unscientific poll, but those who self-selected and cast ballots are likely to be GOP primary voters – note […]

[…] in the field who can attract both Ron Paul’s supporters and Herman Cain’s supporters (an unscientific poll, but those who self-selected and cast ballots are likely to be GOP primary voters – note […]

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