“Pathetic.” “Arrogance.” Those were the key words that Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski used on today’s Morning Joe, respectively, to describe Hillary Clinton’s excuse-making for her loss. As our Mike LaChance—the artist formerly known as Aleister—has noted, Hillary was interviewed by Christiane Amanpour yesterday. Clinton paid lip service to her own mistakes, but ultimately concluded that “the reason I believe we lost were the intervening events in the last 10 days,” citing the Comey letter and Wikileaks.

Scarborough: “So who’s going to say it on the set? Who’s going to say it? Anybody going to say it? That was pathetic. I’ll say it. Let me go out, I’ll get killed.” Mika went on to repeatedly speak of the “arrogance” of Hillary and the Clinton campaign. Sample: Hillary’s comments show “this arrogance, and this sense that this was a coronation was so engrained in her.”

Once Joe opened the floodgates, panelists Richard Haass, Harold Ford, Jr. and Willie Geist also weighed in along similar lines.

On a more visceral level, watching Hillary in action yesterday reminded this Insurrectionist of how Hillary’s persona turned off such a large chunk of the electorate, including white women, 53% of whom voted for Trump.

HILLARY CLINTON: It wasn’t a perfect campaign. There is no such thing. But I was on the way to winning until a combination of Jim Comey’s letter on October 28th and Russian Wikileaks raised doubts in the minds of people who were inclined to vote for me but got scared off . . . If the election had been on October 27th, I’d be your president . . . But the reason I believe we lost were the intervening events in the last 10 days.

JOE SCARBOROUGH: All right. So who’s going to say it on the set? Who’s going to say it? Anybody?

MIKA BRZEZINSKI: Don’t make me say it.

JOE: I’m not going to make you say it. Anybody going to say it? That was pathetic. I’ll say it. Let me go out. I’ll get killed. Everybody I’ve talked to. Everybody I have talked to: Democrats, independents, Republicans alike in the media said that was pathetic . . . It was a pathetic campaign. It was a horrific campaign. And actually, at the end of Shattered, I came to the conclusion, which you came to, which was, Richard, which is: my God, if she had actually won, what would this administration look like?

. . .

MIKA: The fact that she is so strongly saying this now, I mean, so many months after the election, it shows that this arrogance, and this sense that this was a coronation was so engrained in her

JOE: Oh my God.

MIKA: — that she still can’t believe it today.

HAROLD FORD, JR.: And I get that. But she shouldn’t go do that. That may linger for a while, but this is not —

MIKA: You should worry about your election until literally the last vote is cast. And you should not think you’re going to win —

JOE: What did you say, Mika, three weeks out?

MIKA: I said that it was an arrogant campaign.

JOE: And you said they should get off their high horses.

MIKA: I said, get off your high horse. Simmer down. This campaign is arrogant and it still doesn’t have a message. And I remember, actually, being not seen like something a woman should say. Because, you know, women power

. . .

That arrogance, that sort of we are in charge, we are going to be in charge again. We have so much power. We bring in the money. We bring in the people. That arrogance made it impossible for them literally to see what was in front of them, and that is that Bill Clinton was made a liability by Donald Trump’s presence. It as obvious to me when Donald Trump came on the scene, that Bill Clinton all of a sudden, the whole moral conversation can’t be had, or, you don’t want it to be had. And they could never see that. They always saw themselves as somehow off, off-limits for people to talk about.

JOE: Boy. Maureen Dowd saw it from the beginning.