Immediately after the terrorist attack by Mohamed Bouhlel in Nice, France, we were told he was a lone wolf, a guy “recently radicalized,” suffering from depression, with no connection to Islamists or ISIS, a guy who just went crazy and drove his truck through a crowd.

It was all BS, meant to deflect from the Islamic motivation and ties to terror networks.

The cracks began to show when it was learned Bouhlel was texting with others shortly before the attack and several possible accomplices were arrested several days ago, *Shocked* – Nice truck terrorist maybe wasn’t a “lone wolf” after all.

Now we can put all the “lone wolf” stuff to rest, as well as the “recently radicalized” excuses. France 24  reports, Nice truck killer had support, accomplices for carefully planned attack:

French truck killer Mohamed Lahouaiej-Bouhlel received logistical support preparing for his deadly Bastille Day attack in Nice from five suspects who are now in custody, Paris prosecutor François Molins revealed Thursday.

“The investigation underway since the night of July 14 has progressed and not only confirmed the murderous premeditated nature of Mohamed Lahouaiej-Bouhlel’s act, but has also established that he benefitted from support and accomplices,” Molins told a news conference in Paris Thursday….

The five suspects included French, Tunisian and an Albanian nationals, said Molins

Investigations of Bouhlel’s phone records and computer files revealed links to the detained people, including plans to acquire the truck, which was used to plough through the crowd gathered at Nice’s beachfront to watch the Bastille Day fireworks and a gun used by the assailant during the attack….

In one chilling turn of events, Molins said that one of the suspects, a Tunisian named Mohamed Oualid G., had filmed the scene of the crime the day after the carnage, as it crawled with paramedics and journalists.

The attack was planned over months:

Analysis of Bouhlel’s telephone revealed pictures taken at a Bastille Day fireworks display in Nice in 2015, as well as a concert on the city’s Promenade des Anglais on July 17, 2015, at which he had zoomed in on the crowd.

On May 26 last year, he took a photo of an article about the drug Captagon, which Molins said was “used by some jihadists responsible for attacks”.

“It appears… that Mohamed Lahouaiej-Bouhlel planned and developed his criminal project for several months before taking action,” said Molins.

On April 4, another Tunisian, Chokri C., aged 37, had sent Bouhlel a Facebook message reading: “Load the truck with 2,000 tonnes of iron… release the brakes my friend and I will watch”.

Here is the investigators’ press conference: