Happy Constitutions Day! Today marks the day our illustrious government contract was signed and later adopted, effectively nullifying the Articles of Confederation.

To wish our Constitution a proper happy birthday, here’s Senator Cruz:

No Constitutional celebration would be complete without a little throwback:

The Washington Post has a fun Constitutional Knowledge Quiz. Check it out and share your score. Not to brag or anything, but yours truly got a perfect score. ::dusts shoulders::

All fun aside, our Constitution is one of the most (if not the most) incredible documents in human history.

Like so many of our founding documents, the Federalist Papers are riddled with eery truths that hold up against the wiles of modernity. Written as letters to the public by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under guise of pseudonym, the arguments which ultimately make up the Federalist Papers argued in favor of adopting the Constitution. In his conclusion to Federalist 85, Hamilton or “Publius” wrote:

“To balance a large state or society [says he], whether monarchical or republican, on general laws, is a work of so great difficulty, that no human genius, however comprehensive, is able, by the mere dint of reason and reflection, to effect it. The judgments of many must unite in the work; EXPERIENCE must guide their labor; TIME must bring it to perfection, and the FEELING of inconveniences must correct the mistakes which they inevitably fall into in their first trials and experiments.”3 These judicious reflections contain a lesson of moderation to all the sincere lovers of the Union, and ought to put them upon their guard against hazarding anarchy, civil war, a perpetual alienation of the States from each other, and perhaps the military despotism of a victorious demagogue, in the pursuit of what they are not likely to obtain, but from TIME and EXPERIENCE. It may be in me a defect of political fortitude, but I acknowledge that I cannot entertain an equal tranquillity with those who affect to treat the dangers of a longer continuance in our present situation as imaginary. A NATION, without a NATIONAL GOVERNMENT, is, in my view, an awful spectacle. The establishment of a Constitution, in time of profound peace, by the voluntary consent of a whole people, is a PRODIGY, to the completion of which I look forward with trembling anxiety. I can reconcile it to no rules of prudence to let go the hold we now have, in so arduous an enterprise, upon seven out of the thirteen States, and after having passed over so considerable a part of the ground, to recommence the course. I dread the more the consequences of new attempts, because I know that POWERFUL INDIVIDUALS, in this and in other States, are enemies to a general national government in every possible shape.

Happy Birthday, Constitution!

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