The numbers say that the Louisiana Senate runoff is over, but Republican Bill Cassidy hasn’t stopped pushing toward December 6.

In a new ad, Republicans take aim at Democrat incumbent Mary Landrieu’s hallmark failures—most of them having to do with her commitment to remain in lockstep with the Obama Administration’s spiraling agenda.

Take a look:

Deliciously painful, no?

Since I’ve been campaigning in Louisiana, I’ve noticed that the airwaves are saturated with Bill Cassidy’s face; in comparison, I haven’t seen a single ad coming from Mary Landrieu or progressive special interests.

In an interview with Breitbart News, Ending Spending Action Fund President Brian Baker explained how Republicans are teeing up a spectacular win for Cassidy:

Both the Republican National Committee and other conservative groups, including the Susan B. Anthony List, have mounted an aggressive ground game in Louisiana since the November election that prompted this Saturday’s runoff between Landrieu and Cassidy.

“What’s unique about our operation,” Baker told Breitbart News, “is we do the surround-sound approach. We’re doing a lot of direct voter contact. We’re not just a television advertising Super PAC. We talk to voters on radio and online and through direct voter contact via direct mail and email. We do phones and door knocking.”

Although Baker did add that the Ending Spending Action Fund isn’t doing door knocking in Louisiana in advance of Saturday’s election because other groups have already covered that. “Throughout October,” Baker said, “we did extensive micro-targeting, all aimed at most conservative voters.”

Though recent polls show Cassidy in the lead, Baker cautioned that conservatives should take nothing for granted. “Saturday voting is unusual. There’s the SEC championship. It’s the start of hunting season. And Senator Landrieu has shown that she’s a survivor. She’s won runoffs in the past.”

I think that the Cassidy campaign and other advocacy groups are smart to keep pushing until the end. We need a Republican win by as big a margin as possible; it’ll be good for the Senate, good for Louisiana, and good for an oft-divided Republican party that has little to show in the way of successes gained from a united effort.