Really creepy story about how Harvard Business School treated women like children to help them succeed at Harvard Business School.

The social engineering experiment went so far as to teach the best and the brightest how to raise their hands with confidence:

Women at Harvard did fine on tests. But they lagged badly in class participation, a highly subjective measure that made up 50 percent of each final mark. Every year the same hierarchy emerged early on: investment bank and hedge fund veterans, often men, sliced through equations while others — including many women — sat frozen or spoke tentatively. The deans did not want to publicly dwell on the problem: that might make the women more self-conscious. But they lectured about respect and civility, expanded efforts like the hand-raising coaching and added stenographers in every class so professors would no longer rely on possibly biased memories of who had said what.

Here’s a screen capture of student Brooke Boyarsky demonstrating assertive hand raising:

NY Times Brook Boyarsky

The really long article goes on to describe improved performance under the innumerable artificial conditions created to help the women succeed versus the men. Conditions, of course, that do not exist in the real, competitive world.

Otherwise, this story would not be worth writing about.

Then I got to the end:

As Ms. Boyarsky glanced around her new job as a consultant at McKinsey in Dallas, she often noticed that she was outnumbered by men, but she spoke up anyway. She was dating more than she had at school, she added with shy enthusiasm.

No further comment.