I am still chuckling over Glenn Reynolds’ lede into a story about California:

WHAT IS GOOD IN LIFE? Dems Enraged Over Perry ‘Raids’ on Out of State Businesses. “Texas Governor Rick Perry has angered some Democrats for his high profile visits to blue states, inviting businesses to move to Texas.”

I am still cleaning the screen from the coffee I spewed, laughing as I recalled a scene by our former Governor from one of his most popular films:

But, more importantly, I follow Perry’s raids into the Golden State with amusement. It makes our representatives quite apoplectic that our beautiful natural climate is playing second fiddle to a healthy business one.

An excerpt from the piece that Reynolds cited:

Politico:

Perry’s forceful recruitment campaigns, featuring radio and magazine ads as well as personal appearances, promise low-tax, pro-growth policies in Texas —and they also trash the business climate in places like California (“…I hear building a business in California is next to impossible”) and Illinois (“…an environment that, intentionally or not, is designed for you to fail.”)

Those attacks hit where it hurts and have touched off an angry political backlash against Perry outside the Texas borders, with Democrats mocking his attempts to steal jobs as clownish – and warning the Republican governor to keep his handsoff. In a memorable put-down, Gov. Jerry Brown said Perry’s incursions into California were about as effective as breaking wind.

In California, we are now hearing the “lamentation of the women”. Here is a piece by Jason Stanford, a Democratic political consultant living in Texas. He’s the co-author of “Adios, Mofo: Why Rick Perry Will Make America Miss George W. Bush” and blogs at jasonstanford.org.

What Rick Perry Can Learn from California:

…California has so many successful businesses for Perry to poach thanks to its enviable higher education system. Yes, the taxes are high, the regulations burdensome, and its state government only occasionally functional. But the California Institute of Technology, Stanford University, University of California at Berkeley and the other seven research universities churn out entrepreneurial geniuses faster than venture capitalists can fund them.

Stanford’s piece relies on the glories of the past to denigrate the future offered by Perry. For example, he refers to a higher education system that is on the decline and rife with institutionalized political bias.

In fact, finances California’s institutions are such that our graduates are now being hit with “graduation fees“.

In conclusion, lamentations such as Stanford’s and hard economic data means that Perry’s raiders have many successful years of poaching ahead of them in the Golden state.