Boys are getting destroyed at just about every level of the educational spectrum relative to girls, and are keeping away from liberal arts colleges like they’re running from the grim reaper (which is not that bad an analogy considering the hard core feminist agenda at most liberal arts colleges).

But boys still rule math and the hard sciences, and that is an abomination in the eyes of the educational PC police, via NY Times, Girls Excel in the Classroom but Lag in Entry to 8 Elite Schools in the City:

In the United States, girls have outshined boys in high school for years, amassing more A’s, earning more diplomas and gliding more readily into college, where they rack up more degrees — whether at the bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral levels.

STOP right there.  No one seems to be upset about boys falling behind.  But we continue …

But that has not been the trend when it comes to one of the highest accomplishments a New York City student can achieve: winning a seat in one of the specialized high schools.

At all eight of the schools that admit students based on an eighth-grade test, boys outnumber girls, sometimes emphatically.

Boys make up nearly 60 percent of the largest and most renowned schools, Stuyvesant, the Bronx High School of Science and Brooklyn Tech, and as much as 67 percent at the High School for Mathematics, Science and Engineering at City College, according to city statistics.

So?

The fact that girls are underrepresented in New York’s top high schools, which tend to be focused on math and science, and which have more than a dozen Nobel laureates among their alumni, worries some academics who see the schools as prime breeding grounds for future scientists and engineers.

Cart before horse.  Cause and effect.  If a girl can’t get into Bronx High School of Science based on objective test scores, what’s the likelihood she’ll be a Nobel Laureate?

To Chester E. Finn Jr., president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, an education policy group, the gap at the elite schools could be as elemental as their perception as havens for science, technology, engineering or math, making them a natural magnet for boys, just as girls might gravitate to schools known for humanities.

“I don’t think you’re looking at discrimination here,” said Mr. Finn ….

Exactly.

Math is hard.  And it doesn’t discriminate.  Get over it.