comes together in Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s plan to ban large sugared drinks in New York City:

New York City plans to enact a far-reaching ban on the sale of large sodas and other sugary drinks at restaurants, movie theaters and street carts, in the most ambitious effort yet by the Bloomberg administration to combat rising obesity.

The proposed ban would affect virtually the entire menu of popular sugary drinks found in delis, fast-food franchises and even sports arenas, from energy drinks to pre-sweetened iced teas. The sale of any cup or bottle of sweetened drink larger than 16 fluid ounces — about the size of a medium coffee, and smaller than a common soda bottle — would be prohibited under the first-in-the-nation plan, which could take effect as soon as next March.

So buy two smaller sugared drinks.

Or will Bloomberg then ban the sale of multiple small sugared drinks?

So give the guy in line next to you money to buy an extra one for you.

Or will Bloomberg then ban the purchase of a sugered drink for someone else?

So vendors will offer buy one, get one free deals on small sugared drinks.

Or will Bloomberg then ban buy one, get one free promotions.

So vendors will offer free or discounted refills of small sugared drinks.

Or will Bloomber then ban free or discounted refills of small sugared drinks.

So vendors will allow customers to bring their own larger cups to fill themselves with sugared drinks.

Or will Bloomberg then ban the sale of sugared drinks unless accompanied by a vendor-provided cup?

(Sorry I suggested any of the above, but it’s not as if nanny has not thought of it already.)

And what will the next Mayor do when it turns out this all was wrong and made the problem worse, not better, like cheap mortgages and easy student loans:

Drink More Diet Soda, Gain More Weight

People who drink diet soft drinks don’t lose weight. In fact, they gain  weight, a new study shows.

The findings come from eight years of data collected by Sharon P. Fowler,  MPH, and colleagues at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San  Antonio. Fowler reported the data at this week’s annual meeting of the American  Diabetes Association in San Diego.

“What didn’t surprise us was that total soft drink use was linked to  overweight and obesity,” Fowler tells WebMD. “What was surprising was when we  looked at people only drinking diet soft drinks, their risk of obesity was even  higher.”

In fact, when the researchers took a closer look at their data, they found  that nearly all the obesity risk from soft drinks came from diet sodas.

“There was a 41 percent increase in risk of being overweight for every can or  bottle of diet soft drink a person consumes each day,” Fowler says.

Another government-created bubble grows in Brooklyn.

 
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