I previously posted about how Jews were being driven out of Malmö, Sweden, by violence from Muslim immigrants tolerated by anti-Israel leftists, Malmö Syndrome.

As I made clear in that post, Malmö Syndrome was just one of many examples of how anti-Semitism inevitably rises from the Islamist-Leftist anti-Israel coalition.

This report from Germany (h/t It Don’t Make Sense) shows that the Islamists are willing to join forces with right wing extremists as well, The Shared Extremism of Neo-Nazis and Migrant Youth:

Following an anti-Semitic attack in Hanover, German authorities have identified a new source of anti-Semitic hatred in Germany: young migrants from Muslim families. The ideological alliance has officials concerned.

It was supposed to be a carefree festival in Sahlkamp on the outskirts of the northern German city of Hanover. Billed as an “International Day” to celebrate social diversity and togetherness, the June celebration included performances by a multicultural children’s choir called “Happy Rainbow” and the German-Turkish rap duo 3-K. Music from Afghanistan was also on the program.

But then the mood suddenly shifted.

When Hajo Arnds, the organizer of the neighborhood festival, stepped onto the stage at about 6:45 p.m. to announce the next performance, by the Jewish dance group Chaverim, he was greeted with catcalls. “Jews out!” some of the roughly 30 young people standing in front of the stage began shouting. “Gone with the Jews!”

The voices were those of children — voices full of hate, shouted in unison and amplified by a toy megaphone. Arnds, the organizer, was shocked. He knew many of the children, most of them from Arab immigrant families in the neighborhood….

An informal and accidental alliance has been developing for some time between neo-Nazis and some members of a group they would normally despise: Muslim immigrants. The two groups seem to share vaguely similar anti-Semitic ideologies.

Right-wing extremists and Islamists, says Heinz Fromm, the president of the German domestic intelligence agency, the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (BfV), are united by “a common bogeyman: Israel and the Jews as a whole.”

While German right-wing extremists cultivate a “more or less obvious racist anti-Semitism,” says Fromm, the Islamists are “oriented toward the Israeli-Palestinian conflict” and support “anti-Zionist ideological positions, which can also have anti-Jewish and anti-Semitic overtones.” Both extremist movements, says Fromm, “ascribe extraordinary political power to Israel and the Jews, and their goal is to fight this power.”

There is a common denominator in Malmö and Hanover. And it’s not just the involvement of Muslim immigrants.

The common denominator is hatred of Israel, which almost always serves as a thinly veiled proxy for hatred of Jews.

Update: Thanks to a reader for reminding me that the connection between anti-Jewish Muslims and Nazis goes way back. The Grand Mufti of Jerusalem and Adolf Hitler were mutual admirers.

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Related Posts:
Malmö Syndrome
Being Anti-Israel Is Not Being Anti-Semitic, But It Helps
The “Israel-Firsters” Slur Rears Its Ugly Head

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