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New Discovery Leads University Scientists to Claim Existence of Loch Ness Monster is ‘Plausible’

New Discovery Leads University Scientists to Claim Existence of Loch Ness Monster is ‘Plausible’

“The mythical Scottish beast has been a part of folklore for centuries”

The big breakthrough here is the discovery that the plesiosaur could live and feed in fresh water.

LAD Bible reports:

Loch Ness Monster Existence ‘Plausible’ After Incredible Discovery

The existence of the Loch Ness Monster may just be ‘plausible’ after all, a university has concluded following a fascinating discovery.

The mythical Scottish beast has been a part of folklore for centuries, and there have been countless apparent sightings of the mysterious creature.

But of course, very few among us actually think Nessie exists, partly because nobody has even managed to get a good picture of it, partly because the beast would appear to have a long-neck and a small head similar to a plesiosaur – meaning it wouldn’t be able to survive in Loch Ness, because it is a saltwater creature.

However, scientists at the University of Bath, the University of Portsmouth in the UK, and Université Hassan II in Morocco have found small plesiosaur fossils in a 100-million year old river system that is now Morocco’s Sahara Desert.

The fossils include bones and teeth from three-metre long adults and an arm bone from a 1.5 metre long baby.

They hint that these creatures routinely lived and fed in freshwater, alongside frogs, crocodiles, turtles, fish, and the huge aquatic dinosaur Spinosaurus.

These fossils suggest the plesiosaurs were adapted to tolerate freshwater, possibly even spending their lives there, like today’s river dolphins.

Sharing the exciting discovery, the University of Bath stated that it makes the existence of the Loch Ness Monster ‘plausible’ – but the uni added the rather significant caveat that the fossil record ‘suggests that after almost a hundred and fifty million years, the last plesiosaurs finally died out at the same time as the dinosaurs, 66 million years ago’.

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“But of course, very few among us actually think Nessie exists, partly because nobody has even managed to get a good picture of it, partly because the beast would appear to have a long-neck and a small head similar to a plesiosaur – meaning it wouldn’t be able to survive in Loch Ness, because it is a saltwater creature.”

What does a long neck and small head have to do with being a salt water creature? It wouldn’t have gills, so tonicity would not be a problem. Bull sharks are routinely found in fresh water rivers, and they do have gills.

    Opiner in reply to Dimsdale. | July 29, 2022 at 3:05 pm

    Hahaha! I believe…I’m A Believer (The Monkees?)…well, anyhoo (me Scotish accent), last I checked modern humans and dinosaurs didn’t walk the good Earth at the same time. And, the major Dinos were long gone 2 (two) centuries ago. So, with whom and when did this fascinating tale begin?

    Consider this: Scotland, home of my forefathers and foremothers, does not have the allure of Hawaii, or, even Ireland. Scotland is famous for exporting their name….Scotch, and millions of descendants in the USofA.
    But, their efforts to attract the burgeoning tourism industry were not in vain, and so….tada! Meet Nessie…come one and all. Write long well researched Doctoral Thesis, bring the kids, Nessie feeds at midnight, don’t miss it!

The monster left the Loch Ness and moved into the White House.

In these days of DNA analysis, the fact that no one has come up with any Nessie poop suggests that Nessie only exists in people’s imagination.

It’s even more obvious with Bigfoot. No one has ever come up with a tuft of hair or a pile of poop with Bigfoot DNA.

healthguyfsu | July 28, 2022 at 7:59 pm

This is pure sensationalism.

It means these creatures may have lived in freshwater(or the salinity of those areas was variable over million year timelines). That is all. It lends very little connection to the Loch Ness monster or any claims regarding it’s existence.

I really hope the author of this article was just having fun and decided to play along on a shameless ploy to publicize this research.

henrybowman | July 29, 2022 at 1:50 am

A professor of mine went on a Nessie hunt in the ’60s with (then) advanced sonar equipment manufactured by his namesake company. He did not really expect to find Nessie, but was still disappointed that he didn’t.

He did take all us freshmen on a small boat on the Charles River to map the bottom with sonar, disproving the pollution-age joke that “The Charles River has no bottom… the water just gets thicker the deeper you get.”

harleycowboy | July 29, 2022 at 11:04 am

IF this creature is real how many hundreds of years old would it be? Two hundred? Three hundred?

    Milhouse in reply to harleycowboy. | July 29, 2022 at 11:18 am

    Presumably it’s not the same individual creature that’s alleged to have been there since at least 1933. (There’s very little evidence of any such legend before then.) I have always assume the idea (among those who take it seriously) is that there’s a small community of these things, and occasionally one of them is seen. Or not.

Nessie Come Up, by Dr James Robinson:

The scientist sits at his sonar, and he’s scanning the lake for a sign.
His grants have run out, his future’s in doubt and Nessie he never did find.
He squints at the far-off horizon and he stares at the murk below.
Three years it would seem he’s been chasin’ a dream, but he’d much rather die than not know.

CHORUS:
Nessie, come up, I’m waiting…I’ve waited for you so long.
If you exist come out of the mist and prove that the doubters are wrong.
Awake from your sleep, rise out of the deep; my faith and belief are strong.
Ah, Nessie, I’ve waited so, waited so, waited so, Nessie, I’ve waited so long.

The tourist leans over the railing with field-glass and cam’ra in hand.
She’s come all the way from Pittsburgh, PA, but Nessie don’t come on command.
She’s spent all the money she hoarded and she’s stayed overlong at Loch Ness;
But she can’t say goodbye — there’s a tear in her eye, and she’ll never abandon her quest.

CHORUS

The tabloid reporter came scouting for scandal, sensation and dirt —
Like “Nessie Eats Child” or “Monster Goes Wild — 6 Boats Overturned — No One Hurt”.
But the magical Loch has seduced him; at its shimmering surface he stares.
He can no longer write of the sordid and trite; his thoughts run to deeper affairs.

CHORUS

The lady who started the gift shop counts the money the tourists have paid.
She sells for a fee what they came here to see, and at thirty her fortune is made.
But daily she stops be the lakeside in an out-of-the-way little place
Sayin’, “Nessie, m’love, if you’re ever above — I’d like to say ‘thanks’ to your face!”

CHORUS

A blind piper came to the lakeside and he sat on his favorite rock.
He started to play, as he did ev’ry day, and it echoed out over the Loch.
Twelve Nessies rose out of the water, necks swayin’ in time to the beat.
What Scot isn’t stirred when the pipin’ is heard? And he played ’em this melody sweet:

CHORUS (hummed)

CHORUS (sung)