Most Read
Image 01 Image 02 Image 03

Southwestern Illinois College Getting Over a Million in State Grants to Promote ‘Equity’

Southwestern Illinois College Getting Over a Million in State Grants to Promote ‘Equity’

“This is an amazing opportunity to continue to make an impact in our local communities through the implementation of our Workforce Equity programming”

This is a perfect example of how Critical Race Theory concepts are used in schools without mentioning Critical Race Theory. At least they’re pushing some common sense job training.

The College Fix reports:

Southwestern Illinois College to receive $1.4 million in state grants to promote equity

An Illinois community college announced it will be receiving two grants totaling $1.4 million to address equity in the trades.

Southwestern Illinois College, which serves the area near East St. Louis, has said they will use the grant to provide a stipend to students who complete a certificate program and secure employment.

“We are excited to have another year to work with this population of students and help them change their lives,” said Leonard “Gary” Cruise, East St. Louis Higher Education Center Program Outreach Coordinator/Site Administrator in a statement released by the school. “This grant has provided a chance for those who want to take charge of the direction that will push their families into a new start. All of the students who have participated in our programs have been very thankful.”

The school received a $1.4 million Workforce Equity Initiative grant in 2020 and a $1.2 million grant in 2021 to “develop employment training programs to assist minorities in underserved communities.”

According to the school, since 2019, 130 students have received credentials, which means the State of Illinois has spent $20,000 on equity grants for every student that has graduated during that time.

The school offers certificates in welding, food service, forklift training, heating and ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration, phlebotomy, and practical nursing.

“This is an amazing opportunity to continue to make an impact in our local communities through the implementation of our Workforce Equity programming,” said Scott Queener, Ph.D., Director of Enrollment Development and Campus Operations. “The additional funding allows us to continue to offer specialized educational training that targets the current employment gaps in our workforce. As a result of this grant, we are able to expand our educational programs this year.”

DONATE

Donations tax deductible
to the full extent allowed by law.

Comments

Yes. This is one of the reasons this stuff keeps spreading. It’s VERY profitable.

    The Gentle Grizzly in reply to irv. | January 20, 2022 at 8:25 am

    There is always money to be made on scares. I have a college professor who paid for virtually all of his tuition by selling loyalty oath. Yes, he placed it out of the paper advertising loyalty oath for sale. He was worried that you were loyal American collect your $10 in handy was certificate. This was during the house un-American activities committee which hunts.

It’s not enough that 90% of the next to lowest rung of society has infiltrated government department administration (think motor vehicle department) and is supported by your tax dollar, now the politicians have decided that this level must dominate the education administration at all levels as well

P;ease understand that this is a community college serving some economically depressed “inner city” suburbs on the Illinois side of St. Louis.

It is great that they are trying to offer practical training to help their students get actual jobs. In Illinois, most community colleges are supported by a district that levies real estate taxes. Having a state aid for additional job training is a good thing, because of the low quality of tax base.

    lawgrad in reply to lawgrad. | January 20, 2022 at 8:56 am

    Of all the communities served by SWIC, this particular program targets the city of East St. Louis, which has a 97% black population. So, although there is no discriminatory admission requirement, given the program’s location, it is clear who is being served. Historically, the City of St. Louis MO had housing discrimination. In 1940, it was 87% white, and guess where a large portion of the black population lived — across the Mississippi River in East St. Louis, which has never had a thriving economy.

Because Illinois has a large budget surplus, right?

Font Resize
Contrast Mode