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Newly Elected Virginia AG Continues Cleaning House, Fires University Lawyer Serving As Lead J6 Investigator

Newly Elected Virginia AG Continues Cleaning House, Fires University Lawyer Serving As Lead J6 Investigator

Clearly, Youngkin, Sears, Miyares, and the rest of the newly elected Republicans have a vision for cleaning up Virginia’s bureaucracy and reversing a decade-plus slide into radical leftism, over the howls of the Democrats.

Elections have consequences. Sometimes it takes a while to see the results new elected officials can accomplish as they ease their way into office. In the case of the Republican takeover of Virginia, there has been no breaking in period.

Governor Glenn Youngkin, Lt. Gov. Winsome Sears, and Attorney General Jason Miyares have hit the ground running with bold actions to fulfill campaign promises and reverse the actions of their Democratic predecessors. The latest is Miyares, who has fired a lawyer for the University of Virginia who took a leave of absence from his role at the school to lead the congressional investigation into the US Capitol riot on January 6, 2021. Virginia Democrats, naturally, objected to the move.

Reports the New York Times:

The top staff investigator on the House committee scrutinizing the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol has been fired by the state’s new Republican attorney general from his position as the top lawyer for the University of Virginia, from which he was on leave while working on the congressional inquiry.
The office of the Virginia attorney general, Jason S. Miyares, said the firing of the investigator, Timothy J. Heaphy, was not related to the Jan. 6 investigation, but the move prompted an outcry from Democrats in the state, who accused him of taking the highly unusual action as a partisan move to further former President Donald J. Trump’s attempts to undermine the committee’s work.
The move is a latest in a series of bold actions taken since the new team was sworn in on January 15, following the shocking upsets over heavily favored Democrats in the November 2020 elections:

In a series of statements, Victoria LaCivitas, the spokesperson for Miyares, explained the rationale behind firing Heaphy from his job at UVA. Again from the NYT:

In two statements released on Sunday, the attorney general’s office said the firing was unrelated to the Jan. 6 inquiry. In the first, to The Associated Press, Ms. LaCivita said that Mr. Heaphy had been a “controversial” hire and that the “decision was made after reviewing the legal decisions made over the last couple of years.”

“The attorney general wants the university counsel to return to giving legal advice based on law, and not the philosophy of a university,” she added.
In a subsequent statement, Ms. LaCivita said: “It is common practice for an incoming administration to appoint new staff that share the philosophical and legal approach of the attorney general. Every counsel serves at the pleasure of the attorney general.”
One top Virginia Republican said that Mr. Heaphy had angered some Republicans in the state by acting too independently in his job at the university and for his role in the university’s decision in 2020 to allow a student to post a highly critical sign about the school on their door. Mr. Heaphy had privately made the case to the school’s president that while the profanity on the sign was offensive, removing it would have infringed upon the student’s First Amendment rights.

The article casually noted that Heaphy donated to the Clinton and Biden campaigns, and served as a United States attorney. appointed by President Obama. Also, Heaphy “is married to the daughter of Eric K. Shinseki, the retired chief of staff of the Army who served as President Barack Obama’s secretary of veterans affairs.”

In other words, Heaphy is a partisan appointee who was relieved of his state duties when the opposing party took over.

Democrats routinely conduct such firings when they take office, replacing appointees throughout the bureaucracy with folks who more closely align with the perspective of the newly elected official. When Republicans do so, however, it’s “highly unusual,” “payback,” and a “partisan move.” Clearly, Youngkin, Sears, Miyares, and the rest of the newly elected Republicans have a vision for cleaning up Virginia’s bureaucracy and reversing a decade-plus slide into radical leftism, over the howls of the Democrats.


Jeff Reynolds is the author of the book, “Behind the Curtain: Inside the Network of Progressive Billionaires and Their Campaign to Undermine Democracy,” available at www.WhoOwnsTheDems.com. Jeff hosts a podcast at anchor.fm/BehindTheCurtain. You can follow him on Twitter @ChargerJeff, on Parler at @RealJeffReynolds, and on Gab at @RealJeffReynolds.

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Comments

They say the firing is not related to J6. Meh.

If it was related, I see nothing wrong with it. That J6 commission is nothing other than partisan and illegal abuse of power. Anyone participating in it deserves prison time.

the move prompted an outcry from Democrats in the state, who accused him of taking the highly unusual action as a partisan move to further former President Donald J. Trump’s attempts to undermine the committee’s work.

I don’t see how. Now he can concentrate entirely on his work for the witch hunters, without having any further distractions related to UVA. Win-win.

Rupert Smedley Hepplewhite | January 26, 2022 at 7:23 pm

I’m kind of liking this Youngkin guy.

So far, so good! Governor Youngkin has brought fresh air, vitalization and invigoration to the wonderful people of Virginia.

Virginia is a large area with wonderful geography, history and culture. Were it not for the canker sore of “northern” Virginia it would be one of the best places on the Atlantic Coast.

For any biker sorts… you can find fantastic scenery and terrain to indulge nearly any kind of riding you like and during almost 10 months of the year.

It seems nearly unbelievable to see what has become of Loudon County, in the course of my lifetime. Gentility died and public government floated to the top of formerly reliable septic fields.

DOKTOR Coonman Northram had his day, may he remain as “comfortable” as his partial-birth-aborted children, for eternity.

    Yes, Virginia is beautiful!
    I now have hope it may yet be saved.

    jagibbons in reply to NotKennedy. | January 27, 2022 at 8:09 am

    Youngkin and his colleagues are doing the swamp-clearing that Trump should have done within the first year of being POTUS. It can be done, even if it isn’t easy. We would be living in a far different USA if Trump had focused more on clearing out the Obama legacy from federal government.

      Dr.Dave in reply to jagibbons. | January 27, 2022 at 9:14 am

      They probably learned a valuable lesson from the Trump administration. This is proof that a nice guy can be bold!

      healthguyfsu in reply to jagibbons. | January 28, 2022 at 2:36 pm

      Trump couldn’t trust anyone. He was too much of an outsider to know who could be relied upon and who couldn’t within the DC swamp factory. This is why he ended up with people like Sessions as AG. It was his biggest shortcoming and because of the district’s corruption, there wasn’t much he could do about it except hope to find the right people eventually. This is one of the main reasons there was so much turnover in his admin (another being Dem pitchfork mobs).

“When Republicans do so, however, it’s “highly unusual,” “payback,” and a “partisan move.” Excellent, in total agreement, keep the ball rolling clean house. In fact may I suggest setting the house on fire, burning it to the ground as that could possibly lead to a “clean house.”

Trump’s worst mistake when he was the new President was in not firing all the political holdovers from the Obama admin. Those are the ones who conspired to stab him in the back.

    Olinser in reply to OldProf2. | January 26, 2022 at 10:12 pm

    It’s not that he wasn’t willing to do it.

    It’s that Bitch McConnell and the RINOs refused to confirm replacements for ones that he wanted to fire.

    If he gets back in, in 2024, the first thing he needs to do is clean house and call the RINO bluff.

      Danny in reply to Olinser. | January 27, 2022 at 12:09 am

      Trump got his nominees through the senate around the clock, Trump just didn’t do his homework in selecting nominees.

      Trump got his slate of people in, and they cleared house of the MAGA people from his campaign.

      bhwms in reply to Olinser. | January 27, 2022 at 11:33 am

      Remember when he selected Pence, and the reason Conservative, Inc gave us why this was a good choice was that Pence could guide Trump through the swamp, help him decide between friend and foe, etc. We know Trump made some mistakes with former allies and supporters such as Scaramucci, Tillerson, & Sessions. He should have left Sessions in the Senate where he would have been a strong ally.

      Water under the bridge now.

      But most of us didn’t know that the FBI and the IC was so corrupt. Many of us suspected the DoJ was corrupt. Since COVID, add FDA and CDC to the list of corrupt agencies. Now we know. Next GOP administration needs to completely clean house of all agencies, even if those agencies are ineffective for a year. Start making the lists now.

    WISteve in reply to OldProf2. | January 27, 2022 at 12:36 am

    Yes!!
    Trump trusted at the time persons thought reliable as former allies of the Bushies to vet and appoint people. Chris Christie and Condolessa Rice were not to be trusted!!
    The businessman in Trump wanted to give people a fair chance But District of Collusion politics is never fair. Ask them to resign if they appear honorable but firing them is what career pols like Biden & Company does.

      All you have to know is that any Trump appointee had to be approved by the CoupBI which had to do the background checks.

    mailman in reply to OldProf2. | January 27, 2022 at 5:16 am

    And do what exactly? No one…and i mean NO ONE realised just how entrenched the fucking fucks in DC were until Trump came along! Without Trump we would have all just meandered along hurling meaningless words like “deep state” without realising just how deep and dirty the deep state is. It took Trump to shine a great big fuck off light on it!

    The_Mew_Cat in reply to OldProf2. | January 27, 2022 at 10:36 am

    Trump’s biggest problem his whole 4 years was personnel. He didn’t enter office with a good bench, and a 51 vote Senate made confirmation all that much harder, at least initially. And Sessions was probably his worst early pick.

    buck61 in reply to OldProf2. | January 27, 2022 at 10:57 am

    He put to much trust in Priebus and Ryan, neither one of them delivered, both were in over their heads from day one.

The piece of shit has literally been on a ‘leave of absence’ since AUGUST.

If they were really willing to take it to the next level they’d investigate if he was still drawing his government salary the last 6 months.

Comanche Voter | January 27, 2022 at 12:07 pm

You move into a house and there’s a lot of “dust” in the corners (well if the house was a chicken coop there’d be a different kind of “dust” in the corners) and you naturally sweep it out. Youngkin’s crew is not done yet.

I’m not getting it. What position was he actually fired from?

If someone can be on leave from a position for more than a year, then
either the position is not needed or the person holding the position needs to be replaced by someone who can do the job!