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Fort Drum Investigating Three Likely Suicides in Two Days, Including a Soldier Who Helped Evacuate Afghanistan

Fort Drum Investigating Three Likely Suicides in Two Days, Including a Soldier Who Helped Evacuate Afghanistan

Staff Sgt. Angel G. Green, 24, was one of the last soldiers to leave Kabul.

The Army is investigating three possible suicides in the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, New York.

Maj. Gen. Milford H. Beagle, Jr., commander of the division, said: “Immediately when we have a situation when a soldier is suspected of taking their own life, we want to know the trigger. What are the underlying challenges that contributed to the decision to harm themselves? We want to know, what didn’t we catch? What are we missing? This is what our immediate focus is.”

Officials believe these three soldiers died in “self-harm incidents” between September 16 and 17:

  • Private First Class Tyler S. Thomas, 22
  • Staff Sgt. Angel G. Green, 24
  • Specialist Sika M. Tapueluelu, 26

Green helped evacuate people from Kabul, Afghanistan, last month:

Green, an infantryman assigned to 4th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment (The Polar Bears), 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, had recently returned from a deployment to Afghanistan, where he was one of the last soldiers off the ground following the U.S. evacuation effort in the country.

The Afghanistan deployment was Green’s second to the country, though investigators do not believe the deployment was the “primary reason” for his death. Green also deployed to Qatar once.

Thomas worked as a signal support system specialist in Texas. Tapueluelu served as a cannon crewmember in Washington.

Command Sgt. Maj. Mario O. Terenas told the Army Times that the suspected suicides are part of a well-known problem in the entire military:

Terenas stated: “We do not consider this to be a wakeup call. We have been aware for years that the loss of a battle buddy is absolutely soul crushing.”

***Please remember you are never alone. If you or anyone you know is thinking about self-harm or suicide please call the suicide prevention hotline at 1-800-273-8255***

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Comments

The irony of their unit being marked by the Rainbow of exclusive inclusion (“=”).

    Ben Kent in reply to n.n. | September 30, 2021 at 11:01 pm

    Nothing says we’re a deadly fight force like a rainbow.
    I suggest they add a UNICORN for good measure.

    Our adversaries are laughing.
    > Go woke – if you mission is a joke.

    JMark in reply to n.n. | October 1, 2021 at 7:26 am

    That’s the unit patch for the 42nd Infantry Division and the three colors stand for (if I’m not mistaken): blue for infantry, gold for the sun in the state flag of New York, and red for wartime service in both World Wars. They were formed long before rainbows took on another meaning. However, we did subject those guys to lighthearted ribbing when I was there in the early 90s.

    NYBruin in reply to n.n. | October 1, 2021 at 2:58 pm

    The symbol of the 42nd Infantry Division. . .

Oh Jesus, God be with them and their families

Heartbreaking. These Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, and Airmen all did their duty to the best of their ability. They have nothing to be ashamed of because their “leaders” are crap. They did it RIGHT. Please God, put that thought into their heads so they won’t give in to the lie that they are worthless people who did a worthless job. They were betrayed by their seniors (most definitely NOT their superiors).

I have been retired from the Army longer than I was in the Army and it is disheartening to hear that one of my brothers or sisters has taken such a permanent action in response to what is most likely a very temporary set circumstances. Nevertheless, my sympathies and prayers go out to their families.

Far too common for those still serving and Veterans alike. Lot’s of Iraq/Afghan Vets still healing from the toll of the trauma of their experience. I certainly am. Hostile population, unreliable Iraqi and Afghan Army who on occasion targeted their American advisors, snipers, IED at every turn, chlorine bombs, vehicle mounted IED with suicide drivers, bombs strapped onto donkeys and dogs.

The worst, for me, was IED strapped onto folks with downs syndrome who weren’t really capable of understanding. They would send these guys to a gate or checkpoint or flash TCP and because they didn’t obey commands to stay out of our defensive bubble/radius we had no choice but to bring them under fire. Not pleasant and I still think on those experiences wondering what I could have done differently. Nothing actually but still.

Everyone who went outside the wire has their own harrowing stories, not of shooting an enemy combatant, most people can deal with that. It’s the other simply bizarre circumstances that lead to killing someone who was forced into having a IED strapped onto them or the death of a friend or subordinate who deviated from TTP tactics/training/procedure and hesitated before firing on someone or picked up something better left alone or one of two dozen other avoidable errors.

If you have a Vet in your orbit let them talk at their pace. Just listen. Don’t ask questions. They may eventually open up and tell you something you’d rather not know. Don’t judge them because you will betray their trust. Find out if there is an active VFW in your area and support them. Find out who the County Veteran’s Officer is and what resources are available to help. Most psychologist are unprepared to address the trauma of combat. Find one that at least has peacetime military service so they have knowledge base of the pressures and experiences of Iraq and Afghan Veterans. Most important learn the signs of someone on the edge and be brave enough to assist your friend, family member, co-worker or neighbor in getting the help they need when they need it.

Apparently, the military is recruiting unfit for the job, then exposing them to twerk shows by mentally ill transvestites, and enabling treasonouus incompetents to lead the military itself – if not our whole government.

    We have had an all volunteer force since 1973 which has provided plenty of opportunity for anyone concerned about the quality of the personnel recruited to join in place of those you consider ‘unfit’. In fact during the draft era volunteers were not only accepted but welcomed.

    If one was truly concerned they would have joined. If one were really motivated they could have joined during long periods of war; Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan combat eras. Let’s not denigrate anyone’s service or experiences without a good deal more information that places all the events in complete context.

    Thank you. Vietnam almost destroyed my dear, sweet cousin. And then his younger brother was killed there. He was never the same after those experiences.

Capsaicin_Addict | October 1, 2021 at 8:17 am

Uh huh. Suicide, or did they see something they shouldn’t have?

Maybe I’m paranoid, but…

unfortunately have had more experience with this subject and its aftermath than care to relate here

saw a film years ago but cannot recall the title of same–in it, one of the protagonists takes his own life and in the hushed shock of discovery, one of the survivors(an elder clergyman)asks a question for the ages: ” where did his hope go? ”

where, indeed

***Please remember you are never alone. If you or anyone you know is thinking about self-harm or suicide please call the suicide prevention hotline at 1-800-273-8255***

please…please…reach out for help…your life is important to more people than you know

>Terenas stated: “We do not consider this to be a wakeup call. We have been aware for years that the loss of a battle buddy is absolutely soul crushing.”

And yet you will still risk being administratively separated if you admit to SI.

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