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Poll Finds 79 Percent of Students Say Quality of Education Worse With Online Classes

Poll Finds 79 Percent of Students Say Quality of Education Worse With Online Classes

“Only 16 percent of college students responded the quality of their education remained the same”

This is not surprising. Online classes were introduced suddenly to students who payed for a different experience.

The College Fix reports:

79 percent of students say quality of education worse with online courses amid COVID: poll

The results are in — most students are not impressed with distance learning.

The College Fix recently asked 1,000 students: “How has the quality of your education changed because your college or university moved its courses online due to the coronavirus?”

Fifty-four percent of students said it’s “somewhat worse,” and another 25 percent replied it’s “significantly worse,” for a total of 79 percent.

“As a senior, my classes were hands-on application stuff by nature. Online, I have learned nothing,” replied one Clemson University student. “Might as well have given me the degree in March.”

Only 16 percent of college students responded the quality of their education remained the same, 4 percent said it’s somewhat better, and 2 percent said it’s significantly better.

“Going online has helped me a bunch,” one University of Montana student stated. “I have social anxiety and being online has allowed me to finally participate in class discussions. I can also take my time going through the lectures instead of trying to keep up and missing a bunch of content.”

The online survey was conducted April 23 and April 24 exclusively for The College Fix by College Pulse. The sample was drawn from College Pulse’s undergraduate student panel that includes more than 270,000 students representing some 900 different colleges and universities in all 50 states. The margin of error for this survey is +/- 3.5 percent.

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Comments

Morning Sunshine | April 30, 2020 at 10:13 am

as a teacher in my small homeschool co-op, I find it difficult to adjust my teaching style to online.

In person, I can judge understanding by facial expressions, interest by body language, and, as a good teacher, I can adjust my teaching to help with both.

when we moved to online classes, we dropped half of our “subjects”, and focused on only 2 that we felt could most effectively be taught over Zoom.

The sample was drawn from College Pulse’s undergraduate student panel that includes more than 270,000 students representing some 900 different colleges and universities in all 50 states. The margin of error for this survey is +/- 3.5 percent.

Looks like some serious fluffing going on here.

First and most obvious, the “margin of error” implies a sample size of 800 students, not 270,000.

    healthguyfsu in reply to tom_swift. | April 30, 2020 at 3:02 pm

    I think the wording is careful to subtly allow for the fact that nowhere near the 270k responded. The panel might include that many in total, but they may have sampled far less and would have had a fractional response rate at that.

That’s an interesting poll. Much like everything Coronavirus, though, we’ll need more data. I can’t say that I’m surprised that students are unhappy. Our educational model involves a lot of hand holding and spoon feeding that simply won’t take place in an online setting. I know that my daughter’s friends who are local high school students are struggling for that reason (among others.)

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