Our tax dollars at work! The Department of Defense admitted to The New York Post that officials still investigate any reports on UFOs:

In a statement provided exclusively to The Post, a Department of Defense spokesman said a secret government initiative called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program [AATIP] “did pursue research and investigation into unidentified aerial phenomena.”

And while the DOD says it shut down the AATIP in 2012, spokesman Christopher Sherwood acknowledged that the department still investigates claimed sightings of alien spacecraft.

“The Department of Defense is always concerned about maintaining positive identification of all aircraft in our operating environment, as well as identifying any foreign capability that may be a threat to the homeland,” Sherwood said.

“The department will continue to investigate, through normal procedures, reports of unidentified aircraft encountered by US military aviators in order to ensure defense of the homeland and protection against strategic surprise by our nation’s adversaries.”

AATIP came to light in 2017. Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) bragged that he secured “$22 million in annual funding.”

UFO stands for unidentified flying objects, but John Greenewald, Jr., who runs The Black Vault website that “archives declassified government documents on subjects like UFOs, noted how the DoD said unidentified aerial phenomena:

“I’m shocked they said it that way, and the reason is, is they’ve seemingly worked very hard not to say that,” he said.

“So I think that’s a pretty powerful statement because now we have actual evidence — official evidence — that said, ‘Yes, AATIP did deal with UAP cases, phenomena, videos, photos, whatever.’”

Greenewald said he hopes that the Pentagon will release more information about the AATIP, either by voluntary disclosure or through requests under the federal Freedom of Information Act.

“But at least we’re one step closer to the truth,” he said.

Iain Boyd at the University of Michigan wrote at Live Science that the Pentagon remains interested in UFOs “to better understand flying objects that it can’t now identify,” especially during military missions when “a pilot or soldier can’t identify an object.” He continued:

“Situational awareness” is the military term for having complete understanding of the environment in which you are operating. A UFO represents a gap in situational awareness. At the moment, when a Navy pilot sees something strange during flight, just about the only thing he or she can do is ask other pilots and air traffic control what they saw in that place at that time. Globally, the number of UFO reportings in a year has peaked at more than 8,000. It’s not known how many the military experiences.

Even the most heavily documented incidents end up unresolved, despite interviewing dozens of witnesses and reviewing many written documents, as well as lots of audio and video recordings.

All military vehicles have sensors on them “like radar, sonar and lidar.” These vehicles rarely go anywhere alone since satellites follow them. Boyd suggested the military combine information from all of the available technology “to analyze all the many signals as they come in from sensors, separating any observations that it can’t identify.”

If the sensors cannot identify an object, then “the system could even assign sensors on nearby vehicles or orbiting satellites to collect additional information in real time.”