The left is methodically replacing serious academic study with left wing indoctrination. This is just the latest example.

The College Fix reports:

Boston U. honors college abandons Socratic method, Western canon in favor of social justice curriculum

Students enrolled in the Kilachand Honors College at Boston University used to have a required class called “Modernity and its Discontents.”

The freshman seminar included readings by Friedrich Nietzsche, Virginia Woolf and Sigmund Freud, and stood as a prime example of an attempt by the honors college to offer students an education grounded in a classical liberal arts tradition.

But “Modernity and its Discontents” is gone, and so is a popular professor who used to co-teach it, Anna Katsnelson.

In late May, she was abruptly dismissed from her post as assistant director of academic affairs for the honors college at the private university, and for many students enrolled in the program, it was the last straw.

A large contingent of students and recent grads of Kilachand Honors College say the program has taken a wrong turn in recent years. They argue it has largely abandoned its original mission to offer a challenging curriculum anchored in a Western canon and has lost its close-knit community feel centered on a passion for academic rigor and diversity of thought.

In other words, the Socratic method of learning has been scrapped and the honors college has become just another typical liberal arts program with an echo chamber of leftism, its critics say…

In January 2017, English Professor Carrie Preston, then-director of the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, began as the honor college’s new director. In contrast, the original director was a historian. Under Preston, “there is much less diversity of thought and the materials tend toward one direction,” Oldfield said.

“Now this year the freshman class read one book and analyzed it the entire time,” she said, adding the freshmen she spoke to said the class felt like it had a prescribed agenda not conducive to intellectual debate and was as easy as a regular first-year writing course.