North Carolina government official reached a compromise to repeal House Bill 2, the controversial bathroom bill that required people to use the restroom of their birth sex. From CNN:

“l support the House Bill 2 repeal compromise,” Gov. Roy Cooper said. “It’s not a perfect deal, but it repeals House Bill 2 and begins to repair our reputation.”

The deal was approved Thursday morning by the state Senate, and was headed to the House for a final vote. If approved, the bill would then go to Cooper.

“Compromise requires give and take from all sides, and we are pleased this proposal fully protects bathroom safety and privacy,” the state’s Senate Leader Phil Berger and House Speaker Tim Moore said in a joint statement.

The bill states:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ru6xjnjbjsctz7j/H142-CSTC-14%20v1.pdf?dl=0

Gov. Cooper is a Democrat, but the Republicans control the state’s Senate and House. The Senate approved the bill Thursday morning, which now heads to the House. If those legislators approve it, the bill will be sent to Gov. Cooper:

“Compromise requires give and take from all sides, and we are pleased this proposal fully protects bathroom safety and privacy,” the state’s Senate Leader Phil Berger and House Speaker Tim Moore said in a joint statement.

Not everyone agrees with the bill, though. Chris Sgro, the executive director of Equality NC, called the bill “a shell piece of a legislation” which also keeps parts of the old bill alive:

They also object to this language: “No local government in this state may enact or amend an ordinance regulating private employment practices or regulating public accommodations” until December 2020.

That section effectively would stop, for the next three years, a repeat of Charlotte’s ordinance. Charlotte’s City Council had passed a rule that expressly permitted transgender people to use the bathroom that matches the gender they identify with.

“The initiative is not a repeal,” Sgro said. “It’s doubling down on the discrimination that HB2 exacts — it’s HB2.0. It doesn’t allow municipalities to protect people from discrimination till 2020.”

“It doesn’t do anything to better the lives of LGBT North Carolinians.”

So far, organizations that boycotted North Carolina due to the law have not spoken out. The NCAA pulled seven championship events, including the first and second round games of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament in protest of the original legislation.

The NBA moved its All-Star Game from Charlotte to New Orleans. Officials told the state Charlotte could be a contender for the 2019 game if North Carolina repealed the bill.

Artists and businesses have also boycotted North Carolina, including Bryan Adams, PayPal, Pepsi, and Hyatt hotels. Weirdly enough, though, none of them have boycotted places that actually arrest and detain transgender people.