Coddled students who demand safe spaces look even more ridiculous when compared to a student who has seen real combat up close.

The College Fix reports:

Army veteran who joined Ivy League denounces its ‘safe-space culture,’ says it divides people

When Justin Deal enrolled at Columbia University after spending six years in the U.S. Army, he didn’t realize that “safe-space culture,” as he calls it, was flourishing on campus.

He had two tours of duty in Afghanistan under his belt as a sniper for the 173rd Airborne, where there was no talk of “trigger warnings” or “microaggressions.”

Deal, now a 27-year-old studying financial economics, always believed that tales about safe spaces “were just exaggerated stories,” he told The College Fix.

But in his fourth year at Columbia, Deal has gathered enough human intelligence to conclude that safe-space culture is harming students, stifling free speech and promoting segregation.

‘Soldier first’

The Army had a more nuanced view of diversity than he has experienced at Columbia, Deal said.

He worked with people from numerous backgrounds and underwent periodic mandatory “Equal Opportunity trainings” designed to promote respect for other people. It taught him to not only to respect diversity, but to embrace it.

“Diversity is an amazing thing in that it brings with it different viewpoints. No single person or identity group has the answer to every problem,” Deal told The Fix in an email.