A few American birthdays today — the U.S. Army (1775) and Old Glory (1777).

In 1777, the American flag was adopted by our Second Continental Congress. In 1916, President Wilson issues a proclamation officially requesting June 14 be a day celebrating, “emblem of the Union.”

He wrote:

I therefore suggest and request that throughout the nation and if possible in every community the fourteenth day of June be observed as FLAG DAY with special patriotic exercises, at which means shall be taken to give significant expression to our thoughtful love of America, our comprehension of the great mission of liberty and justice to which we have devoted ourselves as a people, our pride in the history and our enthusiasm for the political programme of the nation, our determination to make it greater and purer with each generation, and our resolution to demonstrate to all the world its, vital union in sentiment and purpose, accepting only those as true compatriots who feel as we do the compulsion of this supreme allegiance. Let us on that day rededicate ourselves to the nation, “one and inseparable” from which every thought that is not worthy of our fathers’ first vows in independence, liberty, and right shall be excluded and in which we shall stand with united hearts, for an America which no man can corrupt, no influence draw away from its ideals, no force divide against itself,-a nation signally distinguished among all the nations of mankind for its clear, individual conception alike of its duties and its privileges, its obligations and its rights.

Old Glory remains a powerful symbol of freedom, liberty, and the greatest country God ever gave to mankind.

Seems only appropriate that we celebrate this Flag Day with a 1969 sketch from Red Skelton. Skelton re-enacted a school teacher that suggested his class’s recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance had grown stale.

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