At the last Democrat debate, Hillary Clinton claimed she can’t be an establishment candidate simply because she’s a woman, running to be the first woman president.

That didn’t sit well with some young female voters.

Jenna Lifhits of the Washington Free Beacon:

Young Women in NH ‘Offended’ Clinton Using Gender as Political Tool

Young women in New Hampshire were offended by the way Hillary Clinton uses her gender to garner support, an MSNBC survey revealed Friday.

When MSNBC anchor Tamron Hall asked young female voters about Hillary Clinton’s claim on Wednesday that she is not an establishment candidate because she is a woman, they responded negatively.

One of the respondents said that she did not like how Clinton assumed that her feminism was identical to the feminism of all women.

“I also am a woman. I also face discrimination as being a woman. Her feminism does not represent my feminism, and I think it’s really important to differentiate that,” one young woman said. Her complaint is a common one among young women and reveals a generational divide within the Democratic Party.

Another respondent said that Clinton’s gender does not automatically make her the best candidate.

“You have to realize that, you know, everybody’s human and … you have to go for who has the best ideals,” she said. “Just because she’s a woman doesn’t necessarily make her the best candidate.”

Here’s the related video report:

Women of Hillary’s generation have noticed and are reacting in strange and unhelpful ways. Gloria Steinem recently suggested that young women who back Bernie Sanders are just chasing boys and Madeleine Albright said there’s a special place in Hell for women who don’t back Hillary.

The Los Angeles Times has collected feedback from young women on this issue:

“It is extremely patronizing to women to assume and frankly expect their vote simply because of gender. It should be based on the issues, including who will be a better advocate for women,” Sarah Michael wrote on Facebook.

“Feminists choosing her just because she is a woman, is the opposite of what feminism means. A ‘person’ should be elected by their records, not their gender,” Melissa Pugh wrote.

How do you figure millennial women are all feminists? Having taught high school to these young women, I would say very few of them are feminists. But people are right, and women having a choice to vote for the candidate who speaks for them best is feminism,” Kandi Kipp said on Facebook.

“It really has nothing to do with the virtues of feminism today,” “affableman” wrote in the comments.

This could be a big problem for Hillary Clinton. She’s clearly hoping for a strong coalition of support from women but she might not get it.

Featured image via YouTube.