House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Michael McCaul feels the nation is less safe today than ever before in recent memory.

His concerns were validated by the most recent vapid statements from our Commander-in-Chief.  Speaking alongside French President François Hollande at a joint news conference, President Obama stated that next week’s climate change summit in Paris would be a “powerful rebuke” to terrorists.

“Next week, I will be joining President Hollande and world leaders in Paris for the global climate conference,” Obama said during his prepared remarks, which focused mostly on the efforts to fight the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

“What a powerful rebuke to the terrorists it will be, when the world stands as one and shows that we will not be deterred from building a better future for our children,” he added.

…“I think it is absolutely vital for every country, every leader, to send a signal that the viciousness of a handful of killers does not stop the world from doing vital business, and that Paris … is not going to be cowered by the violent, demented actions of a few,” Obama said about the upcoming climate conference.

Obama has been out of the country extensively since the Paris attacks.  Perhaps, given how angry he gets when Republicans challenge him, he should continue his global tour.

Why?

A vast majority – 97% – of Americans don’t believe climate change is a top priority. Rather, it is terrorism.

The contrast between Obama’s view of the Paris massacre and its meaning with that of Hollande’s is stark.

Critics of the president’s IS policies also cite the contrast in words between the two leaders beyond their actions, pointing out that Obama referred to the attacks in Paris as a “setback” while Hollande called the deadly assaults “an act of war.”

The U.S. said it would “step up” its coordination with France by providing more intelligence and additional airlift. Moreover, Obama called on the European Union to implement a policy to allow airlines to share passenger information.

While sharing airline lists may provide useful data, planes are not the only transportation options available to Islamic terror organizers. The ring-leader of the Paris massacre drove attack groups from Belgium into the famed city.

And it was only August when two hero Marines stopped a terror attack aboard a train between the French capital and Amsterdam. More airlines lists are clearly not the answer.

Hollande is taking the security of his nation more seriously in the wake of the recent slaughters, and is looking to work with another head-of-state.

French President Francois Hollande’s new initiative to forge a trilateral coalition – comprised of France, the United States and Russia – to fight Islamic State (ISIS) in the aftermath of the Paris attacks has raised apprehension in Washington that the Fifth Republic is once again, just as it did under General Charles de Gaulle, making overtures to Russia.

Essentially, Hollande’s call for “bringing together of all those who can realistically fight against this terrorist army in a single, broad coalition” is an echo of the words spoken by Russian President Vladimir Putin at the 70th UN General Assembly in New York in September.

Paris seems to have decided to court Moscow in the global fight against the Islamists, who are successfully recruiting followers in Europe, including France and Russia. The first signs of ground and offshore coordination in Syria have been recorded already, while Putin has ordered his military to cooperate with the French, treating them, in his own words, as “allies.”

While Hollande is reaching out to Putin, Obama is bitterly clinging to his climate change ideals.