Earlier this week, protesters rallied outside of the Democratic National Headquarters in Washington, DC to oppose the rules that DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman-Schultz has imposed on Democratic primary candidates.

What’s the controversy? Most of the opposition boils down to the limited number of debates candidates will have the opportunity to participate in. In addition to scheduling just 6 officially-sanctioned debates, the DNC (via DWS) has limited the potential for rogue forums by creating a new rule: if a Democrat chooses to participate in a non-sanctioned debate, they’ll be banned from future sanctioned ones.

The candidates aren’t happy; even some of DWS’s DNC colleagues aren’t happy (DNC Vice Chairs Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D., Hawaii) and R.T. Rybak released a joint statement asking DWS to revoke the sanctioned debates only-rule); and now, Democratic heavy-hitter Nancy Pelosi has weighed in against DWS’s mandate.

From the LA Times:

Asked in an interview with The Times whether she would like to see more debates scheduled, Pelosi responded, “I would.”

“Hillary does well — I think they all do well on them — and we should have more debates,” Pelosi said. She said she does not have a specific number in mind, but that the 26 debates the Democratic candidates took part in during the 2008 primary was probably too many.

“They thought 26 was too many, and I think it is, and you probably should have something in between,” Pelos said. “But I don’t know that we’re going to have more debates.”

Both Bernie Sanders and Martin O’Malley have come out swinging against DWS and the DNC, saying that this is the party’s attempt to rig the primary in favor of the foundering Hillary Clinton campaign.

O’Malley has been particularly vocal:

The Clinton campaign has been close-mouthed on the issue, saying that the decision is up to the DNC and not the individual candidates.

h/t The Hill

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