For all the spin the left has provided on the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, you’d think they’d have a little more respect for their own race-based premise.

Democrats in Congress probably thought they were performing an act of solidarity when they engaged in a “hands up, don’t shoot” protest on the floor of the House last night, but all they did was cheapen the efforts of actual protesters and make the popular “white cop attacks unarmed black teen” narrative that much more ridiculous.

Mediaite has the scoop:

Democratic members of Congress showed solidarity with Ferguson protesters tonight by making the “Hands up, don’t shoot” gesture on the House floor tonight.

New York’s Hakeem Jeffries and Yvette Clarke, along with Texas’ Al Green, all made the protest gesture on the House floor tonight. Green made the gesture in reference to what the St. Louis Rams did, but touted it as a “new symbol” of protest.

You can also watch the video here, via C-SPAN.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2014/12/01/rep-hakeem-jeffries-d-n-y-brings-hands-up-dont-shoot-to-house-floor/

(Image via WaPo)

First of all, the narrative behind the the “hands up” protest has already been debunked by multiple outlets, so keep that in the back of your mind as you absorb what I’m about to say. This isn’t about reality; this is about the bubble that progressives have created for themselves.

The premise of this protest is that white-on-black crime is so heinous and rampant that blacks everywhere need to be on constant alert for threats from police officers and other authority figures. The premise is that blacks are in constant danger of bodily harm. The premise is that black people are terrified of becoming murder victims at the hands of a racist mob.

A “new symbol of protest?” With the flick of a hand, what started out as a war cry-gone-viral has been reduced to a talisman in the war against general inequality and/or vague injustice, alongside Trayvon Martin’s hoodie and “#NOH8” scratched onto a piece of duct tape.

And ’round and ’round we go. The narrative is dead. Long live the narrative.