Update 7 p.m.: It’s official:

In a second trail-blazing pick for the nation’s top law enforcement officer, President Barack Obama intends to nominate the federal prosecutor in Brooklyn, New York, to become the next attorney general and the first black woman to lead the Justice Department.

Obama’s spokesman said Friday that he will announce his selection of Loretta Lynch from the White House on Saturday. If confirmed by the Senate, she would replace Eric Holder, who announced his resignation in September after serving as the nation’s first black attorney general.

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I admit, I’m prejudiced in favor of Loretta Lynch, my law school classmate and then good acquaintance.

Other than a brief encounter at a reunion, I have not had contact with her since 1984, but I’ve followed her career.  While there certainly is more research to be done, I never viewed her as politicized in her conduct as U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York.

It is reported she will be nominated to replace Eric Holder:

(added) The White House says no decision yet:

AP reported on her low profile yesterday:

She’s an under-the-radar contender to become the first black woman to head the Justice Department.

Loretta Lynch rarely holds news conferences, does interviews or gives speeches in her current job as U.S. attorney in Brooklyn. But the lack of a paper trail on Lynch hasn’t kept her from emerging in recent weeks as one of only a handful of people still under consideration by the White House to replace the outgoing Eric Holder as attorney general….

Lynch, who grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina, began her career as a federal prosecutor in 1990. While a chief assistant U.S. attorney, she was on the trial team in one of the most sensational police brutality cases in city history, the broomstick torture of Haitian immigrant Abner Louima in a precinct bathroom.

She originally served as U.S. attorney in Brooklyn from 1999 to 2001 before entering private practice. She returned to the position in 2010 and was appointed to the Attorney General’s Advisory Committee, a position that required her to spend more time in Washington and drew her closer to Holder.

During her second tenure at one of the country’s busiest federal districts, Lynch’s office has won convictions in a thwarted, al-Qaida sanctioned plot to attack New York City subways, and charged the head of a Mexican drug cartel with 12 murders. More recently, her office brought tax evasion charges against Republican Congressman Michael Grimm that’s scheduled to go to trial next year.

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