This paragraph pretty much sums it up, from an article at The NY Times (emphasis added):

[Tom] Scully, who has spent the last 30-some years oscillating between government and the private sector, is hoping to be his own best proof of the Obamacare gold mine. As a principal health policy adviser under President George H. W. Bush, he helped formulate many of those past Republican initiatives — like the shift to private-insurance programs — that Obamacare has put into law. Under George W. Bush, he ran the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and oversaw a host of proto-Obamacare reforms, like Medicare Part D, which introduced competition into the government-supported health care market. After leaving C.M.S. in 2004, Scully began working simultaneously at Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe, a leading health care private equity firm, and Alston & Bird, a law firm and health care lobbying organization. When the Affordable Care Act became law in 2010, he found himself in the rare position of being a lobbyist, private equity executive and former government health care official with access to a serious amount of capital. During the past three years, as other Republicans have tried to overturn Obamacare, Scully searched for a way to make a killing from it…

On the morning that Congress finalized the deal that would reopen the government and defeat — for a few weeks, at least — the latest Republican effort to derail Obamacare, I visited Scully in his New York office. On his wall was a picture of him with Eric Cantor and John Boehner, and so I asked if he wanted to show off his association with some of the least popular politicians in America. “I’m a Republican,” he said. “Maybe a moderate one, but I’m a Republican.”

Not interested.  At all.