An Op-ed at The NY Times by Judy Bolton-Fasman tells you everything you need to know about how far Elizabeth Warren supporters will go to excuse Warren’s ethnic fraud, All My Mother’s Stories.

In the Op-ed, Bolton-Fasman concludes that the truth of the family lore doesn’t matter, what matters is the effect it had on Warren.  This is in keeping with the narrative of the left-wing media about Warren in the face of near conclusive proof Warren has no actual Native American ancestry.

In the Op-ed, Bolton-Fasman relates how her own family lore told by her mother turned out to be fake, and she excuses Warren because Warren in good faith believed it as did Bolton-Fasman:

ONE of the more hotly contested issues in the Massachusetts Senate race between Scott Brown and Elizabeth Warren has been Ms. Warren’s claim that her mother was part American Indian. Ms. Warren has only family lore to back up her claim, and Senator Brown, accusing her of opportunism, has demanded proof. But as Ms. Warren counters in her own ads: what kid asks her mother for documentation?

I can sympathize….

The stories were made up.

Am I in denial? Or worse, am I knowingly perpetrating a lie?

I don’t think so.  And I don’t think the details of Elizabeth Warren’s story matter as much as the fact that the story has been perpetuated with well-intentioned conviction. It’s a family legend that has inspired her to identify with the dispossessed and work on behalf of the marginalized….

For my own history, I’ve found as solid and authoritative proof as any in my father’s 25th Yale University Reunion book, published in 1965. The thick hardback volume sat on our living room coffee table for years. In it my father reported that his much younger wife, the former Matilde Albuquerque, “is a descendant of the Duke of Albuquerque, and graduated from the University of Havana. She is an English and Spanish teacher, translator and singer, and active in aiding Cuban refugees.”

That’s all the confirmation anyone should need of the peripatetic family lore on which I was weaned. Elizabeth Warren says her parents eventually eloped because her father’s family disapproved of him marrying a woman with Native American blood. That’s all of the corroboration we should need from her too. When it comes to family lore, true and false are often beside the point.

Unlike Bolton-Fasman as to her supposed ancestry, Warren refuses even to admit that she has no Native American ancestry.

But there is a bigger problem Bolton-Fasman ignores:  There is a mountain of evidence that Warren exaggerated or made up the family lore.  In other words, it is not Warren’s parents who lied to her, it is Warren who is lying to us.

Bolton-Fasman ignores actual facts such as Warren not claiming Native American status until she was 38; Warren only claiming Native American status for employment purposes but never associating with Native Americans; Warren’s adult nephew describing the family lore as “rumor” in 2002; and documentary evidence substantially rebutting the existence of the family lore (not just the truth of it), including the supposed elopement.

In short, only a willfull disregard for evidence and truth can lead Warren supporters to excuse Warren’s conduct.

The truth does matter.